Erodex crowned 2019 Kevin O’Connor Charity Golf Day Champions

Over 40 golfers took part in Kevin O’Connor’s charity golf day at South Staffordshire Golf Club on a sunny 20th June 2019 in aid of Cerebral Palsy Sport.

Kevin has supported the charity over the past three years and the funds raised from his unique charity golf days has enabled children, young people and adults with Cerebral Palsy to discover the joys of swimming for the first time.

Kevin O’Connor

Following an enjoyable day of golfing fun for all the teams, the golfers enjoyed a two course dinner and then geared up for the charity auction and presentation of prizes. Thank you to everyone who donated auction items for this year’s charity auction.


Golf Day Results

Our 2019 charity golf day Longest Drive Award went to Trevor Hatt.

Kevin and Trevor receiving his Longest Drive Award.

The Nearest the Pin Award was won by Ryan Glenister. Collected by Trevor Hat

There was plenty of competition for our Pro in the Beat the Pro Competition and only three players managed to Beat our Pro – Matt:

  • Kevin O’Connor
  • Ryan Glenister
  • Mark Searl

When it came to the presentations of prizes, Erodex were crowned champions of the day and took home the trophy.

Kevin and Team Erodex with their trophy and prizes.

Team Erodex

They were closely followed by De Beers – Graham’s Oldies who took second place.

The 2019 Kevin O’Connor Charity Golf Day raised over £2,300 for Cerebral Palsy Sport

Kevin spoke of his gratitude of everyone who played in the golf day and said: 

“I am delighted that the eleventh annual Kevin O’Connor Charity Golf day has managed to raise such a fabulous amount of money for this very deserving charity.  The entire event would not be possible without the participation of the players, the support from Liz and Alison as well as that of Ali Talbot and Jen Basford from Cerebral Palsy Sport and of course, Sue LeBeau and her wonderful staff at South Staffs Golf Club.  I am looking forward to next year’s event already.  In the meantime happy golfing and happy swimming. “

The funds raised in this year’s charity golf day will help support the Worcester Swimming Development Gala that is taking place on October 19th 2019 at Perdiswell Leisure Centre in Worcester as well as further swimming development in the West Midlands in early 2020.

Thank you to everyone who supported the golf day and thank you especially to Kevin for your fantastic support.

Thank you!

Cerebral Palsy Sport welcomes new Trustees

Cerebral Palsy Sport is delighted to welcome two new Trustees to its Board of Trustees following an external recruitment process and induction.

Paul Hermann and Professor Janusz Jankowski joined the Board as Trustees and Non Executive Directors and bring with them a wealth of experience and enthusiasm to make a difference to the the charity.


Paul is a Senior Technical Manager at Cisco Systems, where he leads Digital Transformation and IT Strategy for Cisco’s key customers.  Having been in IT and IT Consultancy for over 20 years and as a technical expert, Paul brings a wealth of experience and skills primarily in the Finance and Public Sector verticals.

Paul is also a passionate and active Inclusion and Diversity Ambassador, a Mentor for Early in Career groups and a volunteer for various charities

Paul Hermann

Professor Janusz Jankowski is trained in clinical medicine, health science research and education. He has worked in senior hospital management as a director and board member in NHS trusts and similarly has been a senior executive in several Universities. He has also been a consultant adviser in health most notably to the Department of Health and Social Care as well as the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence as well as to Parliamentary Committees. Furthermore, he has worked with several charities in the health and sports arena on a pro bono basis.

Date: May 2019

Professor Janusz Jankowski

Sport England release first Active Lives Children and Young People Survey results

World-leading new research published by Sport England, carried out independently by Ipsos MORI, provides the richest evidence yet on which factors positively influence the chance of a child being active. The release comes at a crucial time, given the imminent release of the Government’s School Sport Action plan, its green paper on preventing long-term health conditions, and the plans to use physical activity to integrate communities and reduce childhood obesity

RaceRunning   Swimming

Currently around 3 million children and young people (43.3%) are active, but a third of children (32.9%) are less active, doing less than 30 minutes of activity a day.

To understand this, Sport England’s Active Lives Children and Young People Attitudes Survey – which is the largest survey of its kind – asked children about their attitudes towards sport and physical activity. The results prove for the first time that children’s physical literacy impacts not only the amount of activity they do, but also how much they benefit from this activity.

Physical literacy means that children have a positive attitude towards five elements of taking part in sport and physical activity: enjoyment, confidence, competence (how easy they find it), understanding (that it is beneficial) and knowledge (knowing how to get involved and improve).

The key findings are:

  1. Physically literate children do twice as much activity. The more of the five elements of physical literacy children have, the more active they are.
  2. Enjoyment is the biggest driver of activity levels. Despite the majority of children (68%) understanding that sport and activity is good for them, understanding has the least impact on activity levels.
  3. Children who have all five elements of physically literacy report higher levels of happiness, are more trusting of other children, and report higher levels of resilience (continuing to try if you find something difficult).
  4. Physical literacy decreases with age. As children grow older, they report lower levels of enjoyment, confidence, competence, and understanding. Previous research from Sport England shows that activity levels drop when children reach their teenage years.
  5. The results also reveal important inequalities among certain groups of children which must be tackled:
  • Girls are less likely to say they enjoy or feel confident about doing sport and physical activity (58% of boys enjoy it, compared to 43% of girls. 47% of boys feel confident, compared to 31% of girls). In children aged 5-7, boys are more likely to love playing sport, while girls are more likely to love being active.
  • Children from the least affluent families are less likely to enjoy activity than those from the most affluent families, and previous research shows they are also far less likely to be active.
  • Black children are more physically literate than other ethnic groups – particularly boys, but are less active than the population as a whole.

Commenting, Tim Hollingsworth, Chief Executive at Sport England said:

“This is a critical moment for all of society to better understand what will motivate young people to get active.  This survey gives us the richest evidence yet that sport and physical activity for children needs to be fun and enjoyable above all.

“The fact that a third of children aren’t nearly as active as they need to be demonstrates that we need to do things differently if we want to build a generation of young people who want to take part in physical activity as children and into adulthood.

“With previous research showing that active children have better levels of attendance and achievement, we must prioritise physical literacy with the same vigour that we address numeracy and literacy. Doing so could not only help teaching and learning outcomes, it could be hugely beneficial for the physical and mental health of our children.

“We hope these results will be considered and acted on by all who deliver activity and sport. At Sport England, we look forward to playing our part to get children active as we roll out our national programme to train over 17,000 secondary school teachers in how to offer a greater breadth of PE and school sport that meets the needs of all pupils.”

Mims Davies, Minister for Sport and Civil Society, said:

“The message is clear – fun and enjoyment is what gets and keeps children active. We know an active child is a happier child but too many are losing the confidence and enjoyment of sporting activities as they get older.

“Our upcoming cross Government School Sport Action Plan will help to ensure all children have access to quality PE, sporting sessions and clubs – in school, after school, during weekends and holidays.

“I want to work with the sector as they play their part in making sport and physical activity both enjoyable and engaging for young people of all abilities and backgrounds.”

Children and Families Minister Nadhim Zahawi said:

“We are committed to helping young people live happy and healthy lives by staying active. That’s why this Government introduced the first-ever strategy to tackle childhood obesity as well as boosting the PE and Sport Premium to invest £320 million every year to help primary schools deliver sport.

“We are also encouraging more young people to get involved in physical activity – last year we announced plans to help more children swim confidently and are working with leading sporting bodies, including the Premier League and England Hockey, to increase participation in competitive sports in our schools.

“That all comes ahead of our School Sport Action Plan, which we will publish shortly, to help get more young people active and enjoying the benefits of sport.”

The full report can be downloaded via the Sport England website.

England Athletics launch new project to attract new officials

Interested in Athletics officiating? England Athletics are launching a new scheme aimed at giving people the chance to shadow an experienced and qualified official at a 2019 England Championship event and start measuring success.
The project also gives people first-hand experience officiating at one of England Athletics’ National Championship events throughout the year.

This project is open to anyone who is interested in officiating, and would like to give it a try, shadowing one of their  experienced officials at an EA championships in a variety of disciplines and events.
the events where this can take place is:
23–24 February 2019 –  England U20, U17 & U15 Indoor Championships, Sheffield.
9–10 March 2019 – England U17 & U15 Combined Events Championships, Sheffield
25–26 May 2019 –  England Senior & U20 Combined Events Championships, Bedford
22–23 June 2019 – England Athletics U23 & U20 Championships, Bedford
27–28 July 2019 – England Senior & UKCAU Championships, Manchester
3–4 August 2019 –  England U17 & U15 Combined Events Championships, Manchester
14 Augusr 2019 –  Manchester International, Manchester
31 August –1 September 2019 –  England U17 & U15 Championships, Bedford

To register your interest, please visit their website here

2014-09-20 11.31.22

NICE consults on support and service guidance for children and young people with disabilities

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) are seeking views in their consultation on the NICE guideline on children and young people with disabilities & severe complex needs: integrated health & social care support & service guidance.

The consultation on the draft scope for this NICE guideline closes at 5pm on Tuesday 5 February 2019. The consultation page contains the documents, background documents and instructions on how to comment.

NICE would particularly welcome comments on how to focus the scope further. NICE is aware that the population for the guideline is large and diverse, and the list of questions to be addressed currently quite long. Suggestions as to issues or groups where NICE guidance can add value would be useful.

Committee recruitment will end at the same time the draft scope consultation closes. NICE are recruiting people with a practitioner, care provider or commissioner background and lay members (people using services, family members and carers, and members of the public and community or voluntary sector) to join the Committee for this guideline. More information on the committee recruitment page on the NICE website.

If you have any further queries on this draft scope consultation, NICE request contact be made to CYPseverecomplexneeds@nice.org.uk

NICE logo

 

World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List 2019 Released

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has published the 2019 List of Prohibited Substances and Methods, and UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) has pulled out all the key bits you should know before it comes into effect on 1 January.

Whether you’re an athlete, coach, physio or doctor, it’s vital you are aware of the changes, so you don’t get caught out and end up with a ban from sport.

The List outlines substances and methods which are banned both in and out-of-competition, but it is not exhaustive as most categories only include common examples. It’s updated every October, giving you time to get to grips with any changes before the New Year, but please also be aware that changes can also be made to the Prohibited List throughout the year.

The full List can be quite dry to read unless you’re into chemistry, but it contains vital information you need to know when training, competing or working with athletes. Fortunately, there are no major changes for 2019, but grab yourself a cup of tea, settle into a comfy chair and please take the time to read the summary below.

Several of the changes relate to supplements, or ingredients commonly found within them. UKAD advises athletes to take a food-first approach to nutrition where possible, as no guarantees can ever be made that a supplement is free from banned substances.

WADA  UKAD 2


 

Here are the key things you need to know about the 2019 WADA Prohibited List:

Check your supplements carefully

  • Epiandrosterone has been added as an example of a steroid, which can be found in some dietary supplements.
  • The examples of metabolites of steroids which the body does not naturally produce has been simplified. It now only includes those known to be found in supplements or used as masking agents.
  • More examples of substances which were already prohibited have been added, and these can be found in some supplements, so don’t get caught out. 4-methylpentan-2-amine has been included as another name for DMBA, while 5-methylhexan-2-amine (1,4-dimethylpentylamine) and 3-methylhexan-2-amine (1,2-dimethylpentylamine) were added as examples of substances related to methylhexaneamine.

Don’t let strange names catch you out

  • The following names for substances which were already on the Prohibited List (in brackets below) have been added, so please check ingredients carefully as these may crop up.
  • Dimetamfetamine (dimethylamphetamine)
  • Enobosarm (ostarine)
  • Examorelin (hexarelin)
  • Lenomorelin (ghrelin)
  • More examples of prohibited substances have also been added.
  • Daprodustat (GSK1278863) and vadadustat (AKB-6548) – examples of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) activating agents.
  • BAY 85-3934 – reference name of molidustat, a HIF activating agent.
  • Macimorelin – example of a growth hormone secretagogue.
  • Tretoquinol (trimetoquinol) – example of a beta-2 agonist.
  • 2-Androstenol, 3-Androstenol and 3-Androstenone – examples of substances related to 2-Androstenone.

Know your agents

  • The title of section 4.4 has changed from “Agents modifying myostatin function(s) including, but not limited, to: myostatin inhibitors” to “Agents preventing Activin receptor IIB activation”.
  • The following examples of prohibited substances have been added to reflect the ways in which the Activin receptor can be affected:
  • activin A-neutralizing antibodies
  • activin receptor IIB competitors such as decoy activin receptors (e.g. ACE-031)
  • anti-activin receptor IIB antibodies (e.g. bimagrumab)
  • myostatin inhibitors such as:
    1. agents reducing or ablating myostatin expression
    2. myostatin-binding proteins (e.g. follistatin, myostatin propeptide)
    3. myostatin-neutralizing antibodies (e.g. domagrozumab, landogrozumab, stamulumab)

Gene doping clarified

  • ‘Gene Doping’ has been changed to ‘Gene and Cell Doping’.
  • The definition of gene doping has changed to include the term ‘post-transcriptional’ to clearly define the processes that can be modified by gene editing.
  • Stem cells are not prohibited for treating injuries if their use restores normal function of the affected area, rather than enhancing function.

Cyclists: Be aware of tramadol

While WADA has elected to keep tramadol on the Monitoring List, rather than move it to the Prohibited List, the International Cycling Union (UCI) has announced plans to start testing athletes for tramadol from January. We are awaiting further information from UCI on this, but current reports indicate cyclists will have a finger pin-prick before a race, which detects the presence, or not, of tramadol and its level of concentration. This could lead to cyclists being banned from starting a race if they have used tramadol, primarily due to health concerns. We will update you when we know more.

More information

If you’re in any doubt about any medications or their ingredients, you can check them on the Global DRO website. Supplements can be checked on the Informed Sport website, but please be aware this only minimises the risk, no guarantee can be given that any particular supplement is free from prohibited substances.

If you’re still uncertain, you can contact substanceenquiry@ukad.org.uk.

Athletes who have a legitimate medical reason for using a prohibited substance or method which is on the List, can apply for a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE).

The full 2019 Prohibited List can be viewed here.

A summary of the major modifications and explanatory notes can be viewed here.

New physical activity resource for health professionals

Launched at the International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress (ISPAH) , the new digital Moving Medicine tool will help healthcare professionals advise patients on how physical activity can help to manage their conditions, prevent disease and aid recovery.

It is produced by the Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine (FSEM) in partnership with Public Health England (PHE) and Sport England with support from National Lottery funding.

Currently one in four of the population in England does less than 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity a week and are classified as inactive.

Physical inactivity is in the top 10 greatest causes of ill health nationally, with negative impacts on health, wellbeing, social and economic outcomes for individuals and communities.

Evidence shows that one in four patients would be more active if advised by a GP or nurse, yet nearly three quarters of GPs do not speak about the benefits of physical activity to patients due to either lack of knowledge, skills or confidence.

The tool focuses on helping to address the most common long term health conditions affecting the population, such as cancer, depression, musculoskeletal pain and type 2 diabetes.

Developed in consultation with over 300 healthcare professionals and patients and using evidence-based step-by-step guidance, Moving Medicine is designed to provide healthcare professionals with the latest evidence to address this knowledge and skills gap in the NHS and support healthier outcomes for patients as a result.

Rt Hon Matt Hancock MP, Secretary of State for Health and Social care said:

There is a mountain of evidence to suggest that patients with all kinds of conditions – from depression to diabetes – would benefit from more exercise, yet understandably those suffering with chronic illness are more likely to be inactive.

That’s why it’s so important healthcare professionals have the information they need at their fingertips to advise patients with complex health needs on how to get more active – and this doesn’t have to mean joining a gym. It can be doing more of the things we love, whether that’s playing football, swimming or going for long walks. I am delighted to launch this brilliant web tool for healthcare professionals – I hope it will help pave the way for a culture shift in medicine where referrals for exercise are just as common as prescriptions for medication.

Dr Alison Tedstone, Head of Physical Activity at Public Health England, said:

With millions accessing the NHS every day, healthcare professionals play a vital role in helping people to better understand the benefits of physical activity on their health.

Taking the time to have these conversations has the power to inspire people to move more and make a big difference to their health.

Dr Paul D Jackson, President, Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine (UK) said:

The development of the Moving Medicine platform has been a truly collaborative effort, drawing on the expertise of many across a wide range of different disciplines and professional bodies as well as medical Royal Colleges, associated charities and patient groups.

We all believe that introducing more physical activity into every care pathway across the NHS is an essential, cost-effective intervention to improve people’s health. Moving Medicine will ensure that all health care professionals have up to date information on physical activity presented in a useable, easy to understand format, enabling them to inform their patients and motivate them to become more active.

Sarah Ruane, Strategic Lead for Health, Sport England said:

We know that it can be difficult to fit being active into busy lives. But for people who are dealing with illness or injury the thought of being active can be even more daunting. That’s why healthcare professionals have such a vital role to play.

Moving Medicine is a simple idea with huge potential to transform the lives of the millions of people who are inactive and living with health conditions. Equipping healthcare professionals with the practical information that they need to have supportive conversations with their patients, will help many more people to experience the range of health benefits that being active can bring.

Moving Medicine is a major component of the Moving Healthcare Professionals Programme, which is designed to support healthcare professionals embed physical activity into their approach to treating patients for common conditions in line with existing National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance.

The resource has been launched at the seventh ISPAH congress in London this week (15 to 17 October 2018), which aims to bring the best minds together to bridge the gap between physical activity research, policy and practice to support healthier nations across the world.

First evidence review of physical activity among disabled adults

New nationally developed resources to support disabled adults to get more physically active were launched at the International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress (ISPAH) in London. These include a first evidence review published by Public Health England and a new UK Chief Medical Officer (CMO) infographic to make physical activity recommendations more accessible and support disabled people.

  • Four in five disabled people report they would like to do more physical activity[i]
  • Yet, disabled adults are twice as likely to be inactive than non-disabled adults, with potentially around 3.5 million disabled adults at greater risk of poor health due to inactivity [ii]
  • New resources support disabled adults to get active to improve their health and make physical activity recommendations more accessible

There are 11.5 million disabled people in England and nearly half (42%) are inactive[1]per week compared to 21% of non-disabled people; a two-fold difference. However, four in five disabled people report they would like to do more physical activity, highlighting continued barriers that prevent them from being active.

Concern around safety is often cited as a major barrier to disabled people undertaking physical activity, but the review has shown that when performed at an appropriate level and intensity, this should not hinder them being more active and will lead to health benefits.

The UK is at the forefront of action to address these inequalities with new nationally developed resources to help disabled adults get more physically active being launched at the International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress (ISPAH) in London today.

These include:

  • a world first evidence review published by Public Health England (PHE) that highlights a critical need for disabled adults to do more physical activity to improve their health; and
  • a new UK Chief Medical Officer (CMO) infographic to make physical activity recommendations more accessible and support disabled people in getting more active.

These works consider the breadth of impairments, covering long term physical, sensory, cognitive, and/or mental health impairments, something never done before in the UK.

They have been developed to address psychological barriers which play the biggest role in preventing disabled people from taking part in physical activity, including the attitudes and perceptions of disabled people and non-disabled people that activity might be unsafe or worsen their impairment.

While national physical activity guidelines are currently produced for the whole population, the new evidence shows there is no risk for disabled people undertaking physical activity.

It is recommended that disabled people build up physical activity, concentrating first on frequency, then duration, before finally raising the intensity level. This is especially significant for those that are not active at all and those with other existing health conditions.

The review shows that being more active will improve their health, including improved fitness, muscle strength, undertaking of everyday tasks (e.g. housework and gardening), wellbeing, and sense of community, as well as reduced risk of diseases such as cardiovascular disease.

Launching PHE’s evidence review at the ISPAH Congress, Duncan Selbie, PHE chief executive, said:

“Moving more is important for everyone and we must better support people who face barriers to being active. We can all find something that suits our needs and abilities from walking, to playing ball games, or joining a gym.”

Alongside the evidence review, the existing UK CMOs’ physical activity guidelines have been made more inclusive of disabled people. An infographic for healthcare professionals and disabled people has been produced that better highlights the benefits and practical steps to getting active to improve health.

The infographic has been developed in collaboration with 350 disabled people, 10 disability organisations and 50 healthcare professionals and is endorsed by the four UK CMOs.

Chief Medical Officer for England, Professor Dame Sally Davies, said: 

“Being active is good for our health – both physical and mental. It is important that disabled people in the UK do not miss out on the benefits that being active can bring. I hope that the new infographic, designed by disabled people for disabled people, will help more people reap the benefits of physical activity in a safe and healthy way.”

ISPAH is co-hosted by PHE and Sport England and co-sponsored by the European network for the promotion of health enhancing physical activity (HEPA Europe) and the World Health Organisation (WHO). It aims to bring the best international minds together to bridge the gap between physical activity research, policy and practice to tackle health inequalities and support healthier nations across the world.

 Visit PHE’s website on www.gov.uk/phe.

The PHE evidence review will be available on PHE’s website

  1. The findings have already been adopted as part of the UK Chief Medical Officer’s (CMO) national physical activity guidelines. The 2019 guidelines will support disabled adults to be more physically active to improve their health.
  2. The majority of disabled people (83%) acquire impairment during their lives, which is why these resources focus on adults.
  3. The majority of impairments are not visible, for example Sport England’s Mapping Disability: The Facts reports that fewer than 1 in 10 (5–7%) of disabled people are in a wheelchair.
  4. Physical inactivity is in the top ten greatest causes of ill health nationally, with negative impacts on physical wellbeing, mental wellbeing, individual development, social and community development, and economic development for individuals and communities.

[1] Inactivity refers to people doing less than 30 minutes of moderate intensity activity per week.

[i] The Activity Trap, Activity Alliance, published 8 October 2018, http://www.activityalliance.org.uk/how-we-help/research/the-activity-trap

[ii] Active Lives Adult Survey May 17/18 report, Sport England, published 11 October 2018, https://www.sportengland.org/media/13558/active-lives-adult-may-2017-18-report.pdf

 

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Government Consultation: Review of GCSE, AS and A level physical education activity list

Government consultation: Review of GCSE, AS and A level physical education activity list

The government is seeking views on the review of the PE activity list in schools.

In 2015 the Government committed to reviewing the GCSE, AS and A Level PE activity list in autumn 2018, following the first award of the reformed qualifications in summer 2018.

Accordingly, the Department for Education is now inviting proposals to add activities to the published list.

Responses to the review should be submitted here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/review-of-gcse-as-and-a-level-physical-education-activity-list.

This review is open to the public and the Department will consider all responses.

The deadline for submissions is 20 December 2018.

 

Cerebral Palsy Sport’s Membership approve new Articles of Association

At a specially convened General Meeting of Cerebral Palsy Sport’s membership on 6th October 2018, the membership voted by special resolution to approve the organisation’s new Articles of Association.

The specially convened General Meeting took place to enable members to consider and approve the new draft Articles of Association for the charity in advance of the Annual General meeting.

The 2018 review of the Articles of Association enabled the organisation to strengthen its governance processes and comply to the Governance Code for Sport. the main changes in the Articles were:

  • Charity objects (Part 2.3) aligned to the charities Strategic Objectives
  • Board size reduced to 10 in line with best practise guidance from the code and no less than 3.
  • Defining the role of the Chair more clearly in terms of Board leadership.
  • Independent Board member level strengthened to 20%.
  • Proportion of Board representation of disabled people increased to 10%
  • Proportion of gender balance on the Board increased – 30%
  • Board member length of service changed to three year periods of service before standing down and can seek re-election. Cannot serve more than four years without seeking re-election.
  • Quorum status for Members meetings has been reduced.
  • New voting rights of honorary members and honorary life members.
  • Voting rights to reflect new charity membership categories – families, professional members, organisational members, Sporting Ambassador members,
  • Removing gender reference of Chairman and replacing it with Chair.

The membership voted by 15 voted in favour of adopting the new Articles of Association.

A copy of our new signed Articles of Association can be downloaded below:

CPS Signed Articles of Association 2018

2018 AGM