Kevin O’Connor Charity Golf Day raises over £2,600 for Cerebral Palsy Sport

Cerebral Palsy Sport is delighted to announce that the Kevin O’Connor Charity Golf day staged at South Staffordshire Golf Course on 7th June 2018 has raised over £2,600 for the charity.

Kevin has supported the charity over the past three years and the funds raised from his unique charity golf days has enabled children, young people and adults with Cerebral Palsy to discover the joys of swimming for the first time.

Kevin spoke of his gratitude of everyone who played in the golf day and said:

“I am delighted that the tenth annual Kevin O’Connor Charity Golf day has managed to raise such a fabulous amount of money for this very deserving charity.  The entire event would not be possible without the participation of the players, the support from Liz and Alison Colesby as well as that of Ali Talbot from CP Sport and, of course, Sue LeBeau and her wonderful staff at South Staffs Golf Club.  I am looking forward to next year’s event already, which will be on June 20th 2019.  In the meantime happy golfing and happy swimming. Kevin”

The funds raised in this year’s charity golf day will help support the Worcester Swimming Development Gala that is taking place on October 20th at Perdiswell Leisure Centre in Worcester as well as further swimming development in the West Midlands in early 2019.

Thank you to everyone who supported the golf day and thank you especially to Kevin for your fantastic support.

To read more about this great day of fundraising, please click here for the event report

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CP Sport pays tribute to our Trustee Paul Schorb

Cerebral Palsy Sport is very sad to have to announce the death of our Trustee, Paul Schorb.

Paul had served as a Trustee and Non-Executive Director of Cerebral Palsy Sport for a relatively short period after joining the Board in May 2017 but his impact was immediate.

Paul served on our Board of Trustees and also as a member of the charity’s Finance, Fundraising and Marketing Sub Committee member. He was also a committed Athletics Official especially in Leicestershire and for our events. He had volunteered at a number of our sports and fundraising events.

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Before joining the Board at Cerebral Palsy Sport, Paul retired as the Financial Director and Company Secretary of Glenstone Property Plc in September 2016, following 40 years in both the professional and corporate sector. He was a Fellow of the Chartered Association of Certified Accountants with experience in financial management and reporting, corporate governance and auditing.

Paul enjoyed hill walking, water colour painting, gardening and a variety of sports and also volunteered as a chorister with the Old Dalby Singers and his local Church Group. Paul leaves two adult children.

Aideen Blackborough, Chair of Cerebral Palsy Sport said: “We are all devastated by the sad news of Paul’s death. His contribution to the charity with his financial guidance at Board level, committed volunteering at events and his enthusiasm to support people with cerebral palsy will be so sorely missed. We send our deepest condolences to Paul’s family and friends at this very sad time.”

Cerebral Palsy Sport wins National Charity Award

Cerebral Palsy Sport is delighted to announce that our charity has been selected as one of the Weston Charity Awards winners for 2018. Our Chair Aideen Blackborough and our CEO Ali Talbot collected the award at an Awards Ceremony at the ThinkTank in Birmingham hosted by the Garfield Weston Foundation and Pilotlight.

Cerebral Palsy Sport is one of only 20 small charities that have been selected to receive a core grant of £6,500 and a year’s strategic planning support from Pilotlight as 2018 Weston Charity Awards winners. As the winners are announced, the Garfield Weston Foundation says small charities need support to focus on long-term planning to meet the challenge of rising demand against a backdrop of limited extra resources.

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Image: Aideen Blackborough and Ali Talbot receiving the Weston Charity Award from Phillippa Charles, Director, Garfield Weston Foundation Director.

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Image: Group photos of the 2018 Weston Charity Award winners at the ThinkTank, Birmingham


Nearly 200 applicants applied to the Awards, highlighting the demand for skills and leadership development from small charities on the frontline of delivering welfare, youth and community services to some of the most vulnerable people in society. Well over a third of applications came from charities focused on children and young people – an increase from just under a third in 2017. This increase indicates charity leaders from the youth sector, in particular, are seeking strategic support.

Aideen Blackborough, Chair of Cerebral Palsy Sport said:

Cerebral Palsy Sport is delighted that our charity’s work to support people with cerebral palsy to reach their life potential through sport has been recognised with a Weston Charity Award. We look forward to working with Pilotlight and the Garfield Weston Foundation to grow our services for the future.”

Philippa Charles, Director of the Garfield Weston Foundation which established the Weston Charity Awards said:

“Small charities have stepped up to deliver essential services in their communities and are extremely adept at being highly creative with limited resources. Their directors wear many hats as they juggle multiple roles.”

Initially set up in 2014 to celebrate and support great frontline charities in the North East of England, the Weston Charity Awards quickly expanded to the North West, the Midlands and, in 2018, Wales – areas identified by the Foundation as having the greatest need.

Gillian Murray, Chief Executive of Pilotlight, said:

“Large charities have been in the spotlight in recent months for the right and for the wrong reasons. Meanwhile, up and down the country small charities are quietly facing rising demands for their services. Our programme is an opportunity for the award winners to develop the skills they need to make the maximum impact, even as they are being stretched to capacity.”

The directors of the 20 winning charities will be matched with teams of senior business leaders for a programme of mentoring and coaching, to strengthen their organisations and increase impact.

The charity also receive £6,500 of unrestricted funding from the Garfield Weston Foundation to take part in the programme, as well as access to the advice and support of Pilotlight.

 

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CP Sport and the Giving Machine Team up for Father’s Day

It’s nearly Father’s Day and we all know that Dad’s are heroes so let’s celebrate them on Sunday 17th June 2018.

To help you say “Thank You”, our online fundraising partner the Giving Machine and Decathlon are kindly offering a prize worth £50 for one special Dad! To be in with a chance of winning this for your Dad, simply let us know why your Dad is a hero.

To enter leave a comment on their Facebook  page here or Twitter pages  here

To find out more on how to sign up to support Cerebral Palsy Sport through the giving Machine, please click here

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English Federation of Disability Sport changes name to Activity Alliance

English Federation of Disability Sport changes name to Activity Alliance

The English Federation of Disability Sport (EFDS) has announced that they are changing their name.

A first of many milestones in the charity’s 20th anniversary year, from Thursday 26 April 2018 EFDS will be operating as Activity Alliance.

Commenting on the new name, Barry Horne Chief Executive of Activity Alliance said:

“We are the same team with the same passionate focus on disability, inclusion and sport, but with an exciting new name and image. Through our work with amazing people and influential world-renowned activity programmes for disabled people, we know the time is right for us to embrace this change.

“Activity Alliance brings our members, partners and disabled people together to make active lives possible. Collectively, we continue to challenge perceptions and change the reality of disability, inclusion and sport.”

A brand identity has been developed to support the organisation’s new name and wider remit, which is being introduced a few months ahead of the charity’s 20th anniversary in September.

The change follows a thorough strategic review that included research about the charity’s purpose and its impact. As part of the review, the charity carried out stakeholder consultations with staff, member organisations, disabled people and partners.

The feedback consensus was that the original name, ‘English Federation of Disability Sport’ limited the organisation’s potential.

The review concluded that a new direction and wider remit were needed around well-being, activity and health, creating the opportunity for the charity to deliver greater impact for disabled people.

Find more information on Activity Alliance on their refreshed website www.activityalliance.org.uk and www.activityalliance.org.uk/brand

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CP Sport release What is a RaceRunner? film today

Cerebral Palsy Sport is delighted to launch the second of our new films about the adapted sport of RaceRunning during Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month and part of our #CPCan 2018 campaign.

This film has been developed through a unique partnership between Cerebral Palsy Sport and Nottingham Trent University with TAD Productions.

This film focuses on what a RaceRunner is and how it can be used by people with cerebral palsy and other physical disabilities to become more active and take part in adapted sport.

We are proud to share our second RaceRunning film  – What is a RaceRunner?

For more information on this adapted sport of RaceRunning, please click here:

Our sincere thanks goes to Nottingham Trent University and TAD Productions for supporting this unique project; to the University of Nottingham for hosting us and to Quest 88 for all their support through filming

Our biggest thanks goes to the all the RaceRunners and their families who gave up their time to help to make this film. We could do have done this without you!

 

Over 1000 runners take part in Rushcliffe 10k 2018

Over 1000 runners took part in the Rushcliffe 10K on Sunday 25th March on a glorious day at Rushcliffe Country Park to raise funds for Cerebral Palsy Sport.

Participants who took part in the 10K, 5K or Fun Run were bathed in sunshine and was in complete contrast to the weather that had seen the event postponed from its original date that clashed with the ‘Beast from the East’.

Nottingham based event management company, Perfect Motion, were engaged to deliver this event on behalf of Rushcliffe Borough Council for the first time.  Event Director Chris Simon said,

“We are thrilled to see so many people turn out today to support the Rushcliffe 10K, particularly with us having to change the original date.  They were all certainly rewarded with the weather and we were very impressed with the performances that people put in.

“The way all of the runners supported each other created a fantastic atmosphere and it was lovely to see so many smiling faces at the end.”

The male 10K race was won by Simon Birch of Hinckley Running Club in a time of 33 minutes and 25 seconds.  The female 10K was won by Natalie Bunce in a time of 42 minutes and 48 seconds.

The 5K male race was won by Ed Parry with a time of 19 minutes and 10 seconds while the female 5K race was won by Rosemarie Billenness in a time of 23 minutes and 51 seconds.

Chris continued, “Well done to the winners and to everyone who took part today.  There was a good mixture of serious club runners and people out to challenge themselves.

“I’d like to thank our partners, Rushcliffe Borough Council, Cerebral Palsy Sport, Rushcliffe Athletics Club, Smooth Radio, Impact Physiotherapy and Virtual Runner for all of their support.”

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Ali Talbot, Chief Executive of Cerebral Palsy Sport said “Thank you to all the runners and their families who supported such a great event on a lovely sunny day. A big thank you goes to Perfect Motion, Rushcliffe Borough Council and all the partners involved in the event. Our biggest thank you goes to our brilliant volunteers who gave their time to support the event and we cold not have done it without them. We look forward to seeing everyone next year.”

Entries are open for the 2019 event which will take place on Sunday 3rd March.  Click here to enter today.

Results for each event can be viewed by clicking the relevant link below:

10K Results
5K Results
Fun Run Results

Photos can be viewed by clicking here.

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Cerebral Palsy Sport launch new RaceRunning film

Cerebral Palsy Sport is delighted to launch our new film about the adapted sport of RaceRunning during Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month and part of our #CPCan 2018 campaign. This film has been developed through a unique partnership between Cerebral Palsy Sport and Nottingham Trent University with TAD Productions.

We are proud to share our film with you. Please click below:

RaceRunning is an adapted sport being developed by Cerebral Palsy Sport in England. It is for children, young people and adults who cannot functionally run and rely on sports aids for mobility and balance. Speaking on the launch of the film, Ali Talbot Chief Executive of Cerebral Palsy Sport said:

“We are very proud to be able to introduce our RaceRunning film as part of Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month and are very grateful to the Media students of TAD Productions from Nottingham Trent University that worked so hard to bring this film to fruition. It has been a unique partnership and one we seek to grow for the future with the University.”

Ali also added: “We are also very grateful to the stars of the film – our RaceRunners. Some of them have been taking part for a numbers of years and some have only recently taken up the sport. They show how beautiful this sport can be and the difference it can make to the lives of people with cerebral palsy”.

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RaceRunning is a three wheeled frame where the athlete is supported by a saddle and body plate. The athlete propels against the frame using their feet, and steers using the mobility within their hands and/or arms. People with cerebral palsy can take part as a recreational activity and RaceRunning is a very effective way of improving overall fitness, strength and physical and emotional well-being.

There is also competitions available with athletics events in distances from 60m, 100m, 200m, 400m, 800m and 1500m depending on the athlete’s experience and level of fitness.

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Cerebral Palsy Sport run a series of RaceRunning Start days to introduce people with cerebral palsy into this wonderful adapted sport and to enable them to try the activity for the first time. For more information on our RaceRunning Start days, please visit:

Cerebral Palsy Sport wishes to grow the awareness and participation of this unique adapted sport  of RaceRunning and we are indebted to everyone who has supported this film.

Our sincere thanks goes to Nottingham Trent University and TAD Productions for supporting this unique project; to the University of Nottingham for hosting us and to Quest 88 for all their support through filming

Our biggest thanks goes to the all the RaceRunners and their families who gave up their time to help to make this film. We could do have done this without you!

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Ian Clegg awarded Torch Trophy Trust Volunteering Award

Cerebral Palsy Sport is delighted to announce that Ian Clegg has been awarded a Torch Trophy Trust Award for his commitment to disability sports volunteering at an awards ceremony in London on March 7th. the awards were presented at the Army and Navy Club by HRH Duke of Gloucester.

The Torch Trophy Trust awards recognises the outstanding contribution to volunteers  and it is a celebration of  of the volunteers in British Sport. The Trust has identified and honoured sporting volunteers who ordinarily would neither gain or seek recognition for their work with sports clubs and individual athletes in their local communities

Ian was nominated by Cerebral Palsy Sport in recongition of his unstinting support through volunteering of the work of the charity.

Ian was inspired to get into volunteering by the positive impact made by the Games Makers at London 2012 and his first volunteering experience was at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow 2014. Ian then applied to be a volunteer for the Cerebral Palsy World Games in Nottingham in 2015 and his role developed into volunteer co-ordinator for the Games where he was the main point of communication between the organising committee and the 180 volunteers as well as providing invaluable support to athletes, coaches, volunteers and staff.

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Since the 2015 Nottingham World Games, Ian has continued to volunteer for Cerebral Palsy Sport on a regular basis helping out with sport and fundraising events ass well as some of the general administration behind the scenes. He has also volunteered at other sporting events, particularly at the Nottingham Tennis Centre which hosts tournaments prior to Wimbledon and the British Open Wheelchair Championships, the inaugural Invictus Games, Wheelchair Rugby, Special Olympics and Learning Disability Tennis. Ian epitomises the essence of a disability sports volunteer and is a worthy recipient of the Torch Trophy Trust award for volunteering commitment to disability sports.

In true Ian style, he was not able to collect his award in person as he was just about to start his first volunteering shift at the 2018 Winter Paralympics Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea. The award was collected on his behalf by his daughters Laura and Katie Clegg.

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Congratulations Ian – we are very proud of you and thank you for all your time you devote to CErebral Palsy Sport and other disability sports events.

To read more about Ian’s volunteering story – please click here

Tennis Foundation launches new Junior Futures Potential Programme

Seven of the country’s most promising junior wheelchair players have been selected to be part of a world leading new programme designed by Great Britain’s leading tennis charity, the Tennis Foundation to help them progress towards future international success.

The launch of the new Wheelchair Tennis Junior Futures Potential (JFP) Programme will play a key role in the development of talented, young wheelchair tennis players in the UK. It aims to help gifted juniors progress to the first level of the Tennis Foundation’s World Class Wheelchair Tennis Performance Programme – which boasts the likes of Wimbledon Doubles Champions Gordon Reid and Alfie Hewett at its pinnacle.

The JFP programme comprises six two-day training camps from February to December 2018, covering everything from coaching and performance to elite sport education. The first of the camps took place in London this weekend, with seven talented juniors making their way to the National Tennis Centre for two days of training and development.

The seven juniors selected for the programme all hail from different areas of the UK, with Ruby Bishop (14) from Norwich, Dahnon Ward (12) from Derbyshire, Abbie Breakwell (14) from Derbyshire, Ben Bartram (12) from Norwich, Alex Chason (15) from London, Ross Gourley (16) from Belfast and Greg Slade (15) from Surrey all selected to take part.

In addition to the performance camps, the seven talented juniors will also receive visits to their local training set-up from a Tennis Foundation coach, have access to supporting resources and educational materials and be nominated to receive a training grant from SportsAid; all designed to help their skills both on and off the court.

The new initiative is considered to be at the cutting edge of junior wheelchair sport development programmes across the world. Speaking about the programme, Tennis Foundation Talent ID Coach Rob Cross commented:

“The JFP Programme is a great opportunity for the Tennis Foundation to support and nurture young talented wheelchair tennis players. With the success of some of our elite players over the last few years, we want to give more players the platform to continue this success in the future. This is in line with the growing numbers of juniors we are seeing taking up the game and gives everyone an opportunity to progress through a clear pathway.”

With an opportunity to seamlessly advance to the first level of the Tennis Foundation’s World Class Wheelchair Tennis Performance Programme, the future certainly looks bright for the young GB stars.

For more information or to find out more about the Tennis Foundation’s work with disability tennis, visit the Tennis Foundation’s website.

 

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