Cerebral Palsy Sport partners with England Netball

Cerebral Palsy Sport is proud to be working in partnership with England Netball to create a version of Netball that is inclusive for ambulant CP players.

To do this we are running a discovery day on Wednesday 16th January from 10am-2pm at Holywell Fitness Centre, Loughborough LE11 3QF.

The Discovery day will consist of a number of small netball styles games and practices with England Netball coaching staff and the Cerebral Palsy Sport   team to look at how the current game of Netball can be changed/adapted to be inclusive for CP players.

If you are male or female with CP and would like to play Netball and be a part of the development of the ambulant game then please come along on the day. We are looking for people with cp who are 16 years + to take part in this fantastic new opportunity. If you would like to attend please register with Lisa.Morton-Smith@cpsport.org

Discovery Day

CP Sport visits Portland College

Cerebral Palsy Sport were delighted to attend Portland College last week to meet a group of learners. Portland College is a leading specialist college in Nottinghamshire working with disabled people to develop their employability, independence and communication skills.

We were invited to participate in an event called ‘Meet the Employer’ where learners could ask questions to professionals from different businesses in various sectors.

We answered any questions the learners had about looking for work and explained what it is like working for the different organisations. There were plenty of questions about what it is like to work in sport, what the hours are and the structure of the organisation, as well as interest in the many voluntary roles available.

Find out more about working with Cerebral Palsy Sport here

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Images by Portland College

 

#BigThankYou on International Volunteer Day 2018

International Volunteer Day (IVD) on 5th December was designated by the United Nations in 1985 as an international observance day to celebrate the power and potential of volunteerism.

Volunteering at Cerebral Palsy Sport can cover many different activities from being a sporting official to a trustee on the board, from educating to fundraising and we want volunteering for Cerebral Palsy Sport to be a rewarding and worthwhile experience and we are committed to supporting volunteers.

Volunteers contribute time and energy to support the charity achieve our vision and we could not do it without our volunteers.

Cerebral Palsy Sport are saying a #BigThankYou today to our volunteers, by sharing volunteering stories, feedback and information.

We also encourage participants and clubs to do this too – a nationwide celebration of the dedicated volunteers who make sport and recreation happen. Culminating at BBC Sports Personality of the Year on 16th December, the #BigThankYou is an opportunity for sports clubs projects and fitness groups to acknowledge their volunteers by sharing their stories, posting pictures on social media and thanking them through the hashtag #BigThankYou

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Celebrating International Day of Persons with Disabilities

Today, 3rd December 2018 marks the International Day of Persons with Disabilities.

The annual observance of the International Day of Disabled Persons was proclaimed in 1992, by the United Nations. It aims to promote the rights and well-being of persons with disabilities in all spheres of society and development, and to increase awareness of the situation of persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social, economic and cultural life.

This year, Cerebral Palsy Sport are recognising the day by sharing the voices of Cerebral Palsy Sport event participants. We will be posting feedback from our participants and their families throughout the day on Facebook and Twitter pages using the hashtag #CPVoices

If you have any feedback from our events you would like to share please us the hashtag #CPVoices

Development Gala

Thank you to Cerebral Palsy Sport Ambassador Leon Taylor who has written a blog about the day which we have shared here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cerebral Palsy Sport announce Athletics Series dates for 2019

Cerebral Palsy Sport are pleased to announce the Athletics Series dates for 2019. Events include a variety of track and field disciplines including RaceRunning, with age appropriate throwing equipment and weights being used in the field events.

We encourage new and beginner athletes to take part as well as regular competitors in these prestigious events on the disability sport calendar.

Three new venues have been booked for 2019 – St Albans, Winchester and Derby.

Photo finish has been confirmed at 4 events so far.

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Series Events 2019

St Albans

Date: Saturday 13th April 2019

Venue: Abbey View Golf and Track Facility, St Albans, AL1 2DL

Closing Date: Friday 22nd March 2019

Winchester

Date: Saturday 11th May 2019

Venue: The Winchester Sports Stadium, Milland Road, Winchester,SO23 0QA

Closing Date: Friday 19th April 2019

York

Date: Saturday 15th June 2019

Venue: University of York, James Way, Heslington, York YO10 5NA

Closing Date: Friday 24th May 2019

Derby

Date: Saturday 10th August 2019

Venue: Moorways Stadium, Moor Lane, Allenton Derby, DE24 9HY

Closing Date: Friday 19th July 2019

Cerebral Palsy Sport Athletic Nationals Doncaster 

Date: Saturday 21st September 2019

Venue: Doncaster 98 Stadium Way, Doncaster DN4 5JB

Closing Date: Friday 23rd August 2019

Athletes must be aged 8 or above to enter the Athletic Series events * (excluding Nationals). For Nationals in September Athletes must be 11yrs and above by 31st December 2019.

*Athletes aged 8-11 yrs. can only enter the following events during the series:
Track – 60m, 100m and 200m – ambulant, wheelchair and RaceRunning
Field – howler and golf ball throws.

For full details and the registration form click here

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Cerebral Palsy Sport Swimming events announced for 2019

Cerebral Palsy Sport offer a range of opportunities for swimmers with cerebral palsy from introductory sessions for new swimmers through to specialist coaching and competitive galas, tailored awareness and education courses.

Our Development Galas are for swimmers who have some experience of the aquatic environment. We operate a programme of  Galas that offer an excellent introduction to competitive swimming. They are friendly, supportive and realistic with a starter, timekeepers, heats and staggered timed finals. If necessary a swimmer can be accompanied by a parent or enabler – and swimming aids are permitted.

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The National Championships are a friendly and competitive event. They take place annually in Nottingham and caters for the needs of all active cerebral palsy swimmers from club through to elite levels of ability. The Championships are held using British Swimming classification – but cerebral palsy swimmers without classification may take part as guests if space allows. Capture swim

We are delighted to announce our 2019 dates:

Winchester Development Gala – King’s School – Saturday 23rd February 2019

CP Sport National Swimming Championships – Harvey Hadden Sports Village Nottingham – Sunday 7th April 2019

Swim Series 2019

Liverpool Development Gala- Knowsley Leisure and Culture Park- Sunday 5th May 2019.

Sheffield Development Gala- Ponds Forge ISC- Sunday 14th July 2019.

Worcester Development Gala- Perdiswell Leisure Centre- Saturday 19th October 2019.

North East- To be confirmed soon!

To enter the 2019 swim series, please use the booking form here: Registration Form 2019

For further information about our swimming programme click here or contact Jennifer.Basford@cpsport.org 0115 925 7027

World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List 2019 Released

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has published the 2019 List of Prohibited Substances and Methods, and UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) has pulled out all the key bits you should know before it comes into effect on 1 January.

Whether you’re an athlete, coach, physio or doctor, it’s vital you are aware of the changes, so you don’t get caught out and end up with a ban from sport.

The List outlines substances and methods which are banned both in and out-of-competition, but it is not exhaustive as most categories only include common examples. It’s updated every October, giving you time to get to grips with any changes before the New Year, but please also be aware that changes can also be made to the Prohibited List throughout the year.

The full List can be quite dry to read unless you’re into chemistry, but it contains vital information you need to know when training, competing or working with athletes. Fortunately, there are no major changes for 2019, but grab yourself a cup of tea, settle into a comfy chair and please take the time to read the summary below.

Several of the changes relate to supplements, or ingredients commonly found within them. UKAD advises athletes to take a food-first approach to nutrition where possible, as no guarantees can ever be made that a supplement is free from banned substances.

WADA  UKAD 2


 

Here are the key things you need to know about the 2019 WADA Prohibited List:

Check your supplements carefully

  • Epiandrosterone has been added as an example of a steroid, which can be found in some dietary supplements.
  • The examples of metabolites of steroids which the body does not naturally produce has been simplified. It now only includes those known to be found in supplements or used as masking agents.
  • More examples of substances which were already prohibited have been added, and these can be found in some supplements, so don’t get caught out. 4-methylpentan-2-amine has been included as another name for DMBA, while 5-methylhexan-2-amine (1,4-dimethylpentylamine) and 3-methylhexan-2-amine (1,2-dimethylpentylamine) were added as examples of substances related to methylhexaneamine.

Don’t let strange names catch you out

  • The following names for substances which were already on the Prohibited List (in brackets below) have been added, so please check ingredients carefully as these may crop up.
  • Dimetamfetamine (dimethylamphetamine)
  • Enobosarm (ostarine)
  • Examorelin (hexarelin)
  • Lenomorelin (ghrelin)
  • More examples of prohibited substances have also been added.
  • Daprodustat (GSK1278863) and vadadustat (AKB-6548) – examples of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) activating agents.
  • BAY 85-3934 – reference name of molidustat, a HIF activating agent.
  • Macimorelin – example of a growth hormone secretagogue.
  • Tretoquinol (trimetoquinol) – example of a beta-2 agonist.
  • 2-Androstenol, 3-Androstenol and 3-Androstenone – examples of substances related to 2-Androstenone.

Know your agents

  • The title of section 4.4 has changed from “Agents modifying myostatin function(s) including, but not limited, to: myostatin inhibitors” to “Agents preventing Activin receptor IIB activation”.
  • The following examples of prohibited substances have been added to reflect the ways in which the Activin receptor can be affected:
  • activin A-neutralizing antibodies
  • activin receptor IIB competitors such as decoy activin receptors (e.g. ACE-031)
  • anti-activin receptor IIB antibodies (e.g. bimagrumab)
  • myostatin inhibitors such as:
    1. agents reducing or ablating myostatin expression
    2. myostatin-binding proteins (e.g. follistatin, myostatin propeptide)
    3. myostatin-neutralizing antibodies (e.g. domagrozumab, landogrozumab, stamulumab)

Gene doping clarified

  • ‘Gene Doping’ has been changed to ‘Gene and Cell Doping’.
  • The definition of gene doping has changed to include the term ‘post-transcriptional’ to clearly define the processes that can be modified by gene editing.
  • Stem cells are not prohibited for treating injuries if their use restores normal function of the affected area, rather than enhancing function.

Cyclists: Be aware of tramadol

While WADA has elected to keep tramadol on the Monitoring List, rather than move it to the Prohibited List, the International Cycling Union (UCI) has announced plans to start testing athletes for tramadol from January. We are awaiting further information from UCI on this, but current reports indicate cyclists will have a finger pin-prick before a race, which detects the presence, or not, of tramadol and its level of concentration. This could lead to cyclists being banned from starting a race if they have used tramadol, primarily due to health concerns. We will update you when we know more.

More information

If you’re in any doubt about any medications or their ingredients, you can check them on the Global DRO website. Supplements can be checked on the Informed Sport website, but please be aware this only minimises the risk, no guarantee can be given that any particular supplement is free from prohibited substances.

If you’re still uncertain, you can contact substanceenquiry@ukad.org.uk.

Athletes who have a legitimate medical reason for using a prohibited substance or method which is on the List, can apply for a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE).

The full 2019 Prohibited List can be viewed here.

A summary of the major modifications and explanatory notes can be viewed here.

New physical activity resource for health professionals

Launched at the International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress (ISPAH) , the new digital Moving Medicine tool will help healthcare professionals advise patients on how physical activity can help to manage their conditions, prevent disease and aid recovery.

It is produced by the Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine (FSEM) in partnership with Public Health England (PHE) and Sport England with support from National Lottery funding.

Currently one in four of the population in England does less than 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity a week and are classified as inactive.

Physical inactivity is in the top 10 greatest causes of ill health nationally, with negative impacts on health, wellbeing, social and economic outcomes for individuals and communities.

Evidence shows that one in four patients would be more active if advised by a GP or nurse, yet nearly three quarters of GPs do not speak about the benefits of physical activity to patients due to either lack of knowledge, skills or confidence.

The tool focuses on helping to address the most common long term health conditions affecting the population, such as cancer, depression, musculoskeletal pain and type 2 diabetes.

Developed in consultation with over 300 healthcare professionals and patients and using evidence-based step-by-step guidance, Moving Medicine is designed to provide healthcare professionals with the latest evidence to address this knowledge and skills gap in the NHS and support healthier outcomes for patients as a result.

Rt Hon Matt Hancock MP, Secretary of State for Health and Social care said:

There is a mountain of evidence to suggest that patients with all kinds of conditions – from depression to diabetes – would benefit from more exercise, yet understandably those suffering with chronic illness are more likely to be inactive.

That’s why it’s so important healthcare professionals have the information they need at their fingertips to advise patients with complex health needs on how to get more active – and this doesn’t have to mean joining a gym. It can be doing more of the things we love, whether that’s playing football, swimming or going for long walks. I am delighted to launch this brilliant web tool for healthcare professionals – I hope it will help pave the way for a culture shift in medicine where referrals for exercise are just as common as prescriptions for medication.

Dr Alison Tedstone, Head of Physical Activity at Public Health England, said:

With millions accessing the NHS every day, healthcare professionals play a vital role in helping people to better understand the benefits of physical activity on their health.

Taking the time to have these conversations has the power to inspire people to move more and make a big difference to their health.

Dr Paul D Jackson, President, Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine (UK) said:

The development of the Moving Medicine platform has been a truly collaborative effort, drawing on the expertise of many across a wide range of different disciplines and professional bodies as well as medical Royal Colleges, associated charities and patient groups.

We all believe that introducing more physical activity into every care pathway across the NHS is an essential, cost-effective intervention to improve people’s health. Moving Medicine will ensure that all health care professionals have up to date information on physical activity presented in a useable, easy to understand format, enabling them to inform their patients and motivate them to become more active.

Sarah Ruane, Strategic Lead for Health, Sport England said:

We know that it can be difficult to fit being active into busy lives. But for people who are dealing with illness or injury the thought of being active can be even more daunting. That’s why healthcare professionals have such a vital role to play.

Moving Medicine is a simple idea with huge potential to transform the lives of the millions of people who are inactive and living with health conditions. Equipping healthcare professionals with the practical information that they need to have supportive conversations with their patients, will help many more people to experience the range of health benefits that being active can bring.

Moving Medicine is a major component of the Moving Healthcare Professionals Programme, which is designed to support healthcare professionals embed physical activity into their approach to treating patients for common conditions in line with existing National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance.

The resource has been launched at the seventh ISPAH congress in London this week (15 to 17 October 2018), which aims to bring the best minds together to bridge the gap between physical activity research, policy and practice to support healthier nations across the world.

First evidence review of physical activity among disabled adults

New nationally developed resources to support disabled adults to get more physically active were launched at the International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress (ISPAH) in London. These include a first evidence review published by Public Health England and a new UK Chief Medical Officer (CMO) infographic to make physical activity recommendations more accessible and support disabled people.

  • Four in five disabled people report they would like to do more physical activity[i]
  • Yet, disabled adults are twice as likely to be inactive than non-disabled adults, with potentially around 3.5 million disabled adults at greater risk of poor health due to inactivity [ii]
  • New resources support disabled adults to get active to improve their health and make physical activity recommendations more accessible

There are 11.5 million disabled people in England and nearly half (42%) are inactive[1]per week compared to 21% of non-disabled people; a two-fold difference. However, four in five disabled people report they would like to do more physical activity, highlighting continued barriers that prevent them from being active.

Concern around safety is often cited as a major barrier to disabled people undertaking physical activity, but the review has shown that when performed at an appropriate level and intensity, this should not hinder them being more active and will lead to health benefits.

The UK is at the forefront of action to address these inequalities with new nationally developed resources to help disabled adults get more physically active being launched at the International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress (ISPAH) in London today.

These include:

  • a world first evidence review published by Public Health England (PHE) that highlights a critical need for disabled adults to do more physical activity to improve their health; and
  • a new UK Chief Medical Officer (CMO) infographic to make physical activity recommendations more accessible and support disabled people in getting more active.

These works consider the breadth of impairments, covering long term physical, sensory, cognitive, and/or mental health impairments, something never done before in the UK.

They have been developed to address psychological barriers which play the biggest role in preventing disabled people from taking part in physical activity, including the attitudes and perceptions of disabled people and non-disabled people that activity might be unsafe or worsen their impairment.

While national physical activity guidelines are currently produced for the whole population, the new evidence shows there is no risk for disabled people undertaking physical activity.

It is recommended that disabled people build up physical activity, concentrating first on frequency, then duration, before finally raising the intensity level. This is especially significant for those that are not active at all and those with other existing health conditions.

The review shows that being more active will improve their health, including improved fitness, muscle strength, undertaking of everyday tasks (e.g. housework and gardening), wellbeing, and sense of community, as well as reduced risk of diseases such as cardiovascular disease.

Launching PHE’s evidence review at the ISPAH Congress, Duncan Selbie, PHE chief executive, said:

“Moving more is important for everyone and we must better support people who face barriers to being active. We can all find something that suits our needs and abilities from walking, to playing ball games, or joining a gym.”

Alongside the evidence review, the existing UK CMOs’ physical activity guidelines have been made more inclusive of disabled people. An infographic for healthcare professionals and disabled people has been produced that better highlights the benefits and practical steps to getting active to improve health.

The infographic has been developed in collaboration with 350 disabled people, 10 disability organisations and 50 healthcare professionals and is endorsed by the four UK CMOs.

Chief Medical Officer for England, Professor Dame Sally Davies, said: 

“Being active is good for our health – both physical and mental. It is important that disabled people in the UK do not miss out on the benefits that being active can bring. I hope that the new infographic, designed by disabled people for disabled people, will help more people reap the benefits of physical activity in a safe and healthy way.”

ISPAH is co-hosted by PHE and Sport England and co-sponsored by the European network for the promotion of health enhancing physical activity (HEPA Europe) and the World Health Organisation (WHO). It aims to bring the best international minds together to bridge the gap between physical activity research, policy and practice to tackle health inequalities and support healthier nations across the world.

 Visit PHE’s website on www.gov.uk/phe.

The PHE evidence review will be available on PHE’s website

  1. The findings have already been adopted as part of the UK Chief Medical Officer’s (CMO) national physical activity guidelines. The 2019 guidelines will support disabled adults to be more physically active to improve their health.
  2. The majority of disabled people (83%) acquire impairment during their lives, which is why these resources focus on adults.
  3. The majority of impairments are not visible, for example Sport England’s Mapping Disability: The Facts reports that fewer than 1 in 10 (5–7%) of disabled people are in a wheelchair.
  4. Physical inactivity is in the top ten greatest causes of ill health nationally, with negative impacts on physical wellbeing, mental wellbeing, individual development, social and community development, and economic development for individuals and communities.

[1] Inactivity refers to people doing less than 30 minutes of moderate intensity activity per week.

[i] The Activity Trap, Activity Alliance, published 8 October 2018, http://www.activityalliance.org.uk/how-we-help/research/the-activity-trap

[ii] Active Lives Adult Survey May 17/18 report, Sport England, published 11 October 2018, https://www.sportengland.org/media/13558/active-lives-adult-may-2017-18-report.pdf

 

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Government Consultation: Review of GCSE, AS and A level physical education activity list

Government consultation: Review of GCSE, AS and A level physical education activity list

The government is seeking views on the review of the PE activity list in schools.

In 2015 the Government committed to reviewing the GCSE, AS and A Level PE activity list in autumn 2018, following the first award of the reformed qualifications in summer 2018.

Accordingly, the Department for Education is now inviting proposals to add activities to the published list.

Responses to the review should be submitted here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/review-of-gcse-as-and-a-level-physical-education-activity-list.

This review is open to the public and the Department will consider all responses.

The deadline for submissions is 20 December 2018.