Positive response to the Referee and Volunteer Workshop with the National CP League

A free workshop was held on Saturday 17th August at Tresham College, Kettering for football Referees and Volunteers.

The workshop provided those who attended with an overview of the National CP Football League and the structure of the league for the 2019-2020 season.
Ten participants attended the workshop either in person or via a Webex. There was a mix of current referees within the league and new referees keen to be involved in the league for the upcoming season.  

Comments from those who took part:

“The league rules are clear, it’s important Referees have a good understanding, so the workshop was good. Understanding the classification system was beneficial to me.”

“Course was clear to understand and delivered in a relaxed manner which made it a positive experience.”

“Very interesting and engaging. I have learnt a lot and hopefully will get more involved.”

 
“A Learning day.”

The CP National League fixtures take place from Saturday 28th September.

For more information Rich Kerr 0115 925 7027 or email Richard.kerr@csport.org

CP Sport pays tribute to Janice Eaglesham MBE

Cerebral Palsy Sport were saddened to hear of the sudden death of Janice Eaglesham MBE on Sunday.

One of the most influential individuals involved in disability sport in Scotland, Janice has been Chair of Scottish Disability Sport since 2014. She was also an active tutor delivering education and training courses across Scotland alongside her many other roles in disability sport.

As a member of the CPISRA RaceRunning committee Janice revolutionised the coaching methods of this athletics event and has been a huge support to Cerebral Palsy Sport RaceRunning events and athletes over many years, including at the CPISRA World Games in San Cugat in August 2018.

A pioneer in the coaching of RaceRunning. Janice along with her husband Ian Mirfin founded Red Star Athletics Club and under their coaching, numerous athletes have gone on to represent their country and win medals at World Championship and Paralympics. The club has also received many honours over the years, including Glasgow Club of the Year, and Janice and Ian jointly won Scotland’s Unsung Heroes. 

In 2016 Janice and Ian were both awarded MBEs in the Queen’s New Year’s Honours in recognition of their services to disability sport.

 Janice’s contribution to disability sport has had a positive effect on many individuals and organisations and her passing will impact many. At this time our thoughts are with her husband Ian, her family and her many friends.

Survey Results show more disabled people are active.

Sport England latest Active Lives Adults survey results demonstrate that more women, older adults, disabled people and those with long-term health conditions are getting active.

The results based on data gathered from November 2017-November 2018 show more people are doing at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity (recommended by the Chief Medical officers guidelines) a week compared to 12 months ago.

In addition to the increase in people classed as active, the number of inactive adults – those doing fewer than 30 minutes of physical activity a week has reduced.

This mean that 62.6% of the adult population are now classed as active, with 25.1% now inactive.

The research also shows that enjoyment is the biggest motivator for the active while, for those who are not active, perceived ability has the biggest impact on how much they do.

Figures also show an increase of 133,200 in the number of disabled people and those with long-term health conditions classed as active – the first increase in this category since the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games – with gym sessions showing the biggest growth.

Cerebral Palsy Sports 2017-2020 project ‘Start and Stay Active’ has contributed to the increase in disabled people becoming more active. The ‘Start’ element of the project ensures that there are appropriate opportunities for people with CP and associated physical impairments to access sport and activity. The ‘Stay’ element is there to support people to continue to participate in sport and activity, developing a resilient habit for life.
To find out more about Cerebral Palsy Sports Start and Stay Active project click here
To read the Active Lives Adults report click here

New video to help healthcare professionals support disabled people to be active

Disabled people are currently the least active group in society, and twice as likely as non-disabled people to be physically inactive. Healthcare professionals are an important point of contact, and system of referral, for disabled people looking to be active. Evidence shows that one in four patients would be more active if advised by a healthcare professional[i]. Ahead of World Health Day, Activity Alliance releases a short feature film for healthcare professionals on supporting disabled people to be active.

Highlighting how health and sport organisations can work together effectively to break down barriers, the national charity hopes it leads to more local and national collaboration. In partnership with Public Health England and supported by Sport England, the film introduces the urgent case for change so more disabled people can reap physical and mental health benefits.

As well as highlighting excellent examples, the film contributors give advice on ways others can embed sport and activity into their work. It compliments the Moving Healthcare Professionals programme, led by Sport England and Public Health England. In the film, leaders from Public Health England and the Royal College of Occupational Therapists outline how greater health outcomes can come through an active lifestyle. With support from healthcare professionals, disabled people and people with long-term health conditions can take part in more opportunities.

One of the contributors, Dr Mike Brannan, National Lead for Physical Activity at Public Health England said:

“There are 11.5 million disabled people in England[ii] but they are twice as likely to be inactive than non-disabled people[iii]. This highlights a continued barrier that prevents disabled people from being active.

“It is important that disabled people do not miss out on the benefits of being active and there is great work being undertaken in England to address these inequalities. Activity Alliance’s new health video highlights the significant potential in the health and sport sector working to support disabled people being more active.”

Genevieve Smyth, Professional Advisor at Royal College of Occupational Therapists, said:

“Supporting people to take part in their chosen sport or other physical activity should be everybody’s business in health care. Making personalised care a reality means focusing on people’s strengths, balancing choice and risk. It’s too easy to think sport is risky or too difficult. Many of the barriers disabled people face to physical activity are attitudinal and healthcare professionals need to recognise that physical activity as a clinically effective intervention. Environments can be adapted and activities can be changed to make them accessible, but this only works if we initiate and then consistently build physical activity into health interventions.”

Sport for Confidence is one initiative featured in the new film. A social enterprise that runs throughout Essex, the team supports people who face barriers to participation to get involved in a variety of sporting activities in mainstream settings.

Representatives from Yorkshire Sport Foundation’s Creating Connections programme talk about their success at a regional level. This referral programme operates across South Yorkshire and West Yorkshire. They aim to change lives by supporting local people to get involved in community sport and activity. We hear from visually impaired bowls player, Leanne, on how Creating Connections has supported her to be active again and how it benefits her health.

Barry Horne, Activity Alliance Chief Executive, said:

“Our research shows that seven in ten disabled people want to be more active[iv], but participation is not growing at the rate it needs to. There is significant work to do and we cannot do it alone. Collaboration, especially with disabled people, is key to changing the status quo. We are delighted to work with key leaders in health and sport to ensure more disabled people have access to and enjoy opportunities to be active. This film is a starting point for thousands of healthcare professionals.”

Sarah Ruane, Strategic lead – health at Sport England said:

“We know that healthcare professionals play a hugely influential role in advising their patients to get active. That’s why we are equipping them with practical information that they need to have supportive conversations through the Moving Healthcare Professional programme. These conversations are even more important if an individual feels daunted by the prospect of getting active due to a health diagnosis, injury or disability. The film released today highlights the impact we can have by overcoming these barriers through bridging the gap between the health and sport sectors.”

To coincide with the film release and in recognition of World Health Day (Sunday 7 April 2019), Activity Alliance will be hosting an hour Twitter chat between 1pm – 2pm on Friday 5 April to talk about health, inclusion and sport. Join in the conversation with @AllForActivity and hashtag #InclusiveActivity.

If you are a healthcare professional looking for more information and guidance then please visit www.activityalliance.org.uk/health

You can view the video here

-END-


Activity Alliance:

For further information on Activity Alliance, please contact: Laila Issa, Communications Advisor, email laila@activityalliance.org.uk

Cerebral Palsy Sport:

For more information about Cerebral Palsy Sport events click here

For more information about Cerebral Palsy Sport Training and Resources for professionals click here


Article references:

[i] Source: NHS Digital. Health Survey for England – 2007: Healthy lifestyles: knowledge, attitudes and behaviour

[ii] Source: DWP Family Resources Survey 2015-2016

[iii] Source: Sport England, Active Lives 1 2015-16

[iv] Activity Alliance lifestyle report from September 2013

Sport England release first Active Lives Children and Young People Survey results

World-leading new research published by Sport England, carried out independently by Ipsos MORI, provides the richest evidence yet on which factors positively influence the chance of a child being active. The release comes at a crucial time, given the imminent release of the Government’s School Sport Action plan, its green paper on preventing long-term health conditions, and the plans to use physical activity to integrate communities and reduce childhood obesity

RaceRunning   Swimming

Currently around 3 million children and young people (43.3%) are active, but a third of children (32.9%) are less active, doing less than 30 minutes of activity a day.

To understand this, Sport England’s Active Lives Children and Young People Attitudes Survey – which is the largest survey of its kind – asked children about their attitudes towards sport and physical activity. The results prove for the first time that children’s physical literacy impacts not only the amount of activity they do, but also how much they benefit from this activity.

Physical literacy means that children have a positive attitude towards five elements of taking part in sport and physical activity: enjoyment, confidence, competence (how easy they find it), understanding (that it is beneficial) and knowledge (knowing how to get involved and improve).

The key findings are:

  1. Physically literate children do twice as much activity. The more of the five elements of physical literacy children have, the more active they are.
  2. Enjoyment is the biggest driver of activity levels. Despite the majority of children (68%) understanding that sport and activity is good for them, understanding has the least impact on activity levels.
  3. Children who have all five elements of physically literacy report higher levels of happiness, are more trusting of other children, and report higher levels of resilience (continuing to try if you find something difficult).
  4. Physical literacy decreases with age. As children grow older, they report lower levels of enjoyment, confidence, competence, and understanding. Previous research from Sport England shows that activity levels drop when children reach their teenage years.
  5. The results also reveal important inequalities among certain groups of children which must be tackled:
  • Girls are less likely to say they enjoy or feel confident about doing sport and physical activity (58% of boys enjoy it, compared to 43% of girls. 47% of boys feel confident, compared to 31% of girls). In children aged 5-7, boys are more likely to love playing sport, while girls are more likely to love being active.
  • Children from the least affluent families are less likely to enjoy activity than those from the most affluent families, and previous research shows they are also far less likely to be active.
  • Black children are more physically literate than other ethnic groups – particularly boys, but are less active than the population as a whole.

Commenting, Tim Hollingsworth, Chief Executive at Sport England said:

“This is a critical moment for all of society to better understand what will motivate young people to get active.  This survey gives us the richest evidence yet that sport and physical activity for children needs to be fun and enjoyable above all.

“The fact that a third of children aren’t nearly as active as they need to be demonstrates that we need to do things differently if we want to build a generation of young people who want to take part in physical activity as children and into adulthood.

“With previous research showing that active children have better levels of attendance and achievement, we must prioritise physical literacy with the same vigour that we address numeracy and literacy. Doing so could not only help teaching and learning outcomes, it could be hugely beneficial for the physical and mental health of our children.

“We hope these results will be considered and acted on by all who deliver activity and sport. At Sport England, we look forward to playing our part to get children active as we roll out our national programme to train over 17,000 secondary school teachers in how to offer a greater breadth of PE and school sport that meets the needs of all pupils.”

Mims Davies, Minister for Sport and Civil Society, said:

“The message is clear – fun and enjoyment is what gets and keeps children active. We know an active child is a happier child but too many are losing the confidence and enjoyment of sporting activities as they get older.

“Our upcoming cross Government School Sport Action Plan will help to ensure all children have access to quality PE, sporting sessions and clubs – in school, after school, during weekends and holidays.

“I want to work with the sector as they play their part in making sport and physical activity both enjoyable and engaging for young people of all abilities and backgrounds.”

Children and Families Minister Nadhim Zahawi said:

“We are committed to helping young people live happy and healthy lives by staying active. That’s why this Government introduced the first-ever strategy to tackle childhood obesity as well as boosting the PE and Sport Premium to invest £320 million every year to help primary schools deliver sport.

“We are also encouraging more young people to get involved in physical activity – last year we announced plans to help more children swim confidently and are working with leading sporting bodies, including the Premier League and England Hockey, to increase participation in competitive sports in our schools.

“That all comes ahead of our School Sport Action Plan, which we will publish shortly, to help get more young people active and enjoying the benefits of sport.”

The full report can be downloaded via the Sport England website.

NICE consults on support and service guidance for children and young people with disabilities

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) are seeking views in their consultation on the NICE guideline on children and young people with disabilities & severe complex needs: integrated health & social care support & service guidance.

The consultation on the draft scope for this NICE guideline closes at 5pm on Tuesday 5 February 2019. The consultation page contains the documents, background documents and instructions on how to comment.

NICE would particularly welcome comments on how to focus the scope further. NICE is aware that the population for the guideline is large and diverse, and the list of questions to be addressed currently quite long. Suggestions as to issues or groups where NICE guidance can add value would be useful.

Committee recruitment will end at the same time the draft scope consultation closes. NICE are recruiting people with a practitioner, care provider or commissioner background and lay members (people using services, family members and carers, and members of the public and community or voluntary sector) to join the Committee for this guideline. More information on the committee recruitment page on the NICE website.

If you have any further queries on this draft scope consultation, NICE request contact be made to CYPseverecomplexneeds@nice.org.uk

NICE logo

 

Cerebral Palsy Sport partners with England Netball

Cerebral Palsy Sport is proud to be working in partnership with England Netball to create a version of Netball that is inclusive for ambulant CP players.

To do this we are running a discovery day on Wednesday 16th January from 10am-2pm at Holywell Fitness Centre, Loughborough LE11 3QF.

The Discovery day will consist of a number of small netball styles games and practices with England Netball coaching staff and the Cerebral Palsy Sport   team to look at how the current game of Netball can be changed/adapted to be inclusive for CP players.

If you are male or female with CP and would like to play Netball and be a part of the development of the ambulant game then please come along on the day. We are looking for people with cp who are 16 years + to take part in this fantastic new opportunity. If you would like to attend please register with Lisa.Morton-Smith@cpsport.org

Discovery Day

CP Sport visits Portland College

Cerebral Palsy Sport were delighted to attend Portland College last week to meet a group of learners. Portland College is a leading specialist college in Nottinghamshire working with disabled people to develop their employability, independence and communication skills.

We were invited to participate in an event called ‘Meet the Employer’ where learners could ask questions to professionals from different businesses in various sectors.

We answered any questions the learners had about looking for work and explained what it is like working for the different organisations. There were plenty of questions about what it is like to work in sport, what the hours are and the structure of the organisation, as well as interest in the many voluntary roles available.

Find out more about working with Cerebral Palsy Sport here

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Images by Portland College

 

Celebrating International Day of Persons with Disabilities

Today, 3rd December 2018 marks the International Day of Persons with Disabilities.

The annual observance of the International Day of Disabled Persons was proclaimed in 1992, by the United Nations. It aims to promote the rights and well-being of persons with disabilities in all spheres of society and development, and to increase awareness of the situation of persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social, economic and cultural life.

This year, Cerebral Palsy Sport are recognising the day by sharing the voices of Cerebral Palsy Sport event participants. We will be posting feedback from our participants and their families throughout the day on Facebook and Twitter pages using the hashtag #CPVoices

If you have any feedback from our events you would like to share please us the hashtag #CPVoices

Development Gala

Thank you to Cerebral Palsy Sport Ambassador Leon Taylor who has written a blog about the day which we have shared here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cerebral Palsy Sport announce Athletics Series dates for 2019

Cerebral Palsy Sport are pleased to announce the Athletics Series dates for 2019. Events include a variety of track and field disciplines including RaceRunning, with age appropriate throwing equipment and weights being used in the field events.

We encourage new and beginner athletes to take part as well as regular competitors in these prestigious events on the disability sport calendar.

Three new venues have been booked for 2019 – St Albans, Winchester and Derby.

Photo finish has been confirmed at 4 events so far.

Capture athletics series 2019

Series Events 2019

St Albans

Date: Saturday 13th April 2019

Venue: Abbey View Golf and Track Facility, St Albans, AL1 2DL

Closing Date: Friday 22nd March 2019

Winchester

Date: Saturday 11th May 2019

Venue: The Winchester Sports Stadium, Milland Road, Winchester,SO23 0QA

Closing Date: Friday 19th April 2019

York

Date: Saturday 15th June 2019

Venue: University of York, James Way, Heslington, York YO10 5NA

Closing Date: Friday 24th May 2019

Derby

Date: Saturday 10th August 2019

Venue: Moorways Stadium, Moor Lane, Allenton Derby, DE24 9HY

Closing Date: Friday 19th July 2019

Cerebral Palsy Sport Athletic Nationals Doncaster 

Date: Saturday 21st September 2019

Venue: Doncaster 98 Stadium Way, Doncaster DN4 5JB

Closing Date: Friday 23rd August 2019

Athletes must be aged 8 or above to enter the Athletic Series events * (excluding Nationals). For Nationals in September Athletes must be 11yrs and above by 31st December 2019.

*Athletes aged 8-11 yrs. can only enter the following events during the series:
Track – 60m, 100m and 200m – ambulant, wheelchair and RaceRunning
Field – howler and golf ball throws.

For full details and the registration form click here

Capture TT