CP Sport visits Portland College

Cerebral Palsy Sport were delighted to attend Portland College last week to meet a group of learners. Portland College is a leading specialist college in Nottinghamshire working with disabled people to develop their employability, independence and communication skills.

We were invited to participate in an event called ‘Meet the Employer’ where learners could ask questions to professionals from different businesses in various sectors.

We answered any questions the learners had about looking for work and explained what it is like working for the different organisations. There were plenty of questions about what it is like to work in sport, what the hours are and the structure of the organisation, as well as interest in the many voluntary roles available.

Find out more about working with Cerebral Palsy Sport here

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Images by Portland College

 

Celebrating International Day of Persons with Disabilities

Today, 3rd December 2018 marks the International Day of Persons with Disabilities.

The annual observance of the International Day of Disabled Persons was proclaimed in 1992, by the United Nations. It aims to promote the rights and well-being of persons with disabilities in all spheres of society and development, and to increase awareness of the situation of persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social, economic and cultural life.

This year, Cerebral Palsy Sport are recognising the day by sharing the voices of Cerebral Palsy Sport event participants. We will be posting feedback from our participants and their families throughout the day on Facebook and Twitter pages using the hashtag #CPVoices

If you have any feedback from our events you would like to share please us the hashtag #CPVoices

Development Gala

Thank you to Cerebral Palsy Sport Ambassador Leon Taylor who has written a blog about the day which we have shared here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cerebral Palsy Sport announce Athletics Series dates for 2019

Cerebral Palsy Sport are pleased to announce the Athletics Series dates for 2019. Events include a variety of track and field disciplines including RaceRunning, with age appropriate throwing equipment and weights being used in the field events.

We encourage new and beginner athletes to take part as well as regular competitors in these prestigious events on the disability sport calendar.

Three new venues have been booked for 2019 – St Albans, Winchester and Derby.

Photo finish has been confirmed at 4 events so far.

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Series Events 2019

St Albans

Date: Saturday 13th April 2019

Venue: Abbey View Golf and Track Facility, St Albans, AL1 2DL

Closing Date: Friday 22nd March 2019

Winchester

Date: Saturday 11th May 2019

Venue: The Winchester Sports Stadium, Milland Road, Winchester,SO23 0QA

Closing Date: Friday 19th April 2019

York

Date: Saturday 15th June 2019

Venue: University of York, James Way, Heslington, York YO10 5NA

Closing Date: Friday 24th May 2019

Derby

Date: Saturday 10th August 2019

Venue: Moorways Stadium, Moor Lane, Allenton Derby, DE24 9HY

Closing Date: Friday 19th July 2019

Cerebral Palsy Sport Athletic Nationals Doncaster 

Date: Saturday 21st September 2019

Venue: Doncaster 98 Stadium Way, Doncaster DN4 5JB

Closing Date: Friday 23rd August 2019

Athletes must be aged 8 or above to enter the Athletic Series events * (excluding Nationals). For Nationals in September Athletes must be 11yrs and above by 31st December 2019.

*Athletes aged 8-11 yrs. can only enter the following events during the series:
Track – 60m, 100m and 200m – ambulant, wheelchair and RaceRunning
Field – howler and golf ball throws.

For full details and the registration form click here

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World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List 2019 Released

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has published the 2019 List of Prohibited Substances and Methods, and UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) has pulled out all the key bits you should know before it comes into effect on 1 January.

Whether you’re an athlete, coach, physio or doctor, it’s vital you are aware of the changes, so you don’t get caught out and end up with a ban from sport.

The List outlines substances and methods which are banned both in and out-of-competition, but it is not exhaustive as most categories only include common examples. It’s updated every October, giving you time to get to grips with any changes before the New Year, but please also be aware that changes can also be made to the Prohibited List throughout the year.

The full List can be quite dry to read unless you’re into chemistry, but it contains vital information you need to know when training, competing or working with athletes. Fortunately, there are no major changes for 2019, but grab yourself a cup of tea, settle into a comfy chair and please take the time to read the summary below.

Several of the changes relate to supplements, or ingredients commonly found within them. UKAD advises athletes to take a food-first approach to nutrition where possible, as no guarantees can ever be made that a supplement is free from banned substances.

WADA  UKAD 2


 

Here are the key things you need to know about the 2019 WADA Prohibited List:

Check your supplements carefully

  • Epiandrosterone has been added as an example of a steroid, which can be found in some dietary supplements.
  • The examples of metabolites of steroids which the body does not naturally produce has been simplified. It now only includes those known to be found in supplements or used as masking agents.
  • More examples of substances which were already prohibited have been added, and these can be found in some supplements, so don’t get caught out. 4-methylpentan-2-amine has been included as another name for DMBA, while 5-methylhexan-2-amine (1,4-dimethylpentylamine) and 3-methylhexan-2-amine (1,2-dimethylpentylamine) were added as examples of substances related to methylhexaneamine.

Don’t let strange names catch you out

  • The following names for substances which were already on the Prohibited List (in brackets below) have been added, so please check ingredients carefully as these may crop up.
  • Dimetamfetamine (dimethylamphetamine)
  • Enobosarm (ostarine)
  • Examorelin (hexarelin)
  • Lenomorelin (ghrelin)
  • More examples of prohibited substances have also been added.
  • Daprodustat (GSK1278863) and vadadustat (AKB-6548) – examples of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) activating agents.
  • BAY 85-3934 – reference name of molidustat, a HIF activating agent.
  • Macimorelin – example of a growth hormone secretagogue.
  • Tretoquinol (trimetoquinol) – example of a beta-2 agonist.
  • 2-Androstenol, 3-Androstenol and 3-Androstenone – examples of substances related to 2-Androstenone.

Know your agents

  • The title of section 4.4 has changed from “Agents modifying myostatin function(s) including, but not limited, to: myostatin inhibitors” to “Agents preventing Activin receptor IIB activation”.
  • The following examples of prohibited substances have been added to reflect the ways in which the Activin receptor can be affected:
  • activin A-neutralizing antibodies
  • activin receptor IIB competitors such as decoy activin receptors (e.g. ACE-031)
  • anti-activin receptor IIB antibodies (e.g. bimagrumab)
  • myostatin inhibitors such as:
    1. agents reducing or ablating myostatin expression
    2. myostatin-binding proteins (e.g. follistatin, myostatin propeptide)
    3. myostatin-neutralizing antibodies (e.g. domagrozumab, landogrozumab, stamulumab)

Gene doping clarified

  • ‘Gene Doping’ has been changed to ‘Gene and Cell Doping’.
  • The definition of gene doping has changed to include the term ‘post-transcriptional’ to clearly define the processes that can be modified by gene editing.
  • Stem cells are not prohibited for treating injuries if their use restores normal function of the affected area, rather than enhancing function.

Cyclists: Be aware of tramadol

While WADA has elected to keep tramadol on the Monitoring List, rather than move it to the Prohibited List, the International Cycling Union (UCI) has announced plans to start testing athletes for tramadol from January. We are awaiting further information from UCI on this, but current reports indicate cyclists will have a finger pin-prick before a race, which detects the presence, or not, of tramadol and its level of concentration. This could lead to cyclists being banned from starting a race if they have used tramadol, primarily due to health concerns. We will update you when we know more.

More information

If you’re in any doubt about any medications or their ingredients, you can check them on the Global DRO website. Supplements can be checked on the Informed Sport website, but please be aware this only minimises the risk, no guarantee can be given that any particular supplement is free from prohibited substances.

If you’re still uncertain, you can contact substanceenquiry@ukad.org.uk.

Athletes who have a legitimate medical reason for using a prohibited substance or method which is on the List, can apply for a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE).

The full 2019 Prohibited List can be viewed here.

A summary of the major modifications and explanatory notes can be viewed here.

New physical activity resource for health professionals

Launched at the International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress (ISPAH) , the new digital Moving Medicine tool will help healthcare professionals advise patients on how physical activity can help to manage their conditions, prevent disease and aid recovery.

It is produced by the Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine (FSEM) in partnership with Public Health England (PHE) and Sport England with support from National Lottery funding.

Currently one in four of the population in England does less than 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity a week and are classified as inactive.

Physical inactivity is in the top 10 greatest causes of ill health nationally, with negative impacts on health, wellbeing, social and economic outcomes for individuals and communities.

Evidence shows that one in four patients would be more active if advised by a GP or nurse, yet nearly three quarters of GPs do not speak about the benefits of physical activity to patients due to either lack of knowledge, skills or confidence.

The tool focuses on helping to address the most common long term health conditions affecting the population, such as cancer, depression, musculoskeletal pain and type 2 diabetes.

Developed in consultation with over 300 healthcare professionals and patients and using evidence-based step-by-step guidance, Moving Medicine is designed to provide healthcare professionals with the latest evidence to address this knowledge and skills gap in the NHS and support healthier outcomes for patients as a result.

Rt Hon Matt Hancock MP, Secretary of State for Health and Social care said:

There is a mountain of evidence to suggest that patients with all kinds of conditions – from depression to diabetes – would benefit from more exercise, yet understandably those suffering with chronic illness are more likely to be inactive.

That’s why it’s so important healthcare professionals have the information they need at their fingertips to advise patients with complex health needs on how to get more active – and this doesn’t have to mean joining a gym. It can be doing more of the things we love, whether that’s playing football, swimming or going for long walks. I am delighted to launch this brilliant web tool for healthcare professionals – I hope it will help pave the way for a culture shift in medicine where referrals for exercise are just as common as prescriptions for medication.

Dr Alison Tedstone, Head of Physical Activity at Public Health England, said:

With millions accessing the NHS every day, healthcare professionals play a vital role in helping people to better understand the benefits of physical activity on their health.

Taking the time to have these conversations has the power to inspire people to move more and make a big difference to their health.

Dr Paul D Jackson, President, Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine (UK) said:

The development of the Moving Medicine platform has been a truly collaborative effort, drawing on the expertise of many across a wide range of different disciplines and professional bodies as well as medical Royal Colleges, associated charities and patient groups.

We all believe that introducing more physical activity into every care pathway across the NHS is an essential, cost-effective intervention to improve people’s health. Moving Medicine will ensure that all health care professionals have up to date information on physical activity presented in a useable, easy to understand format, enabling them to inform their patients and motivate them to become more active.

Sarah Ruane, Strategic Lead for Health, Sport England said:

We know that it can be difficult to fit being active into busy lives. But for people who are dealing with illness or injury the thought of being active can be even more daunting. That’s why healthcare professionals have such a vital role to play.

Moving Medicine is a simple idea with huge potential to transform the lives of the millions of people who are inactive and living with health conditions. Equipping healthcare professionals with the practical information that they need to have supportive conversations with their patients, will help many more people to experience the range of health benefits that being active can bring.

Moving Medicine is a major component of the Moving Healthcare Professionals Programme, which is designed to support healthcare professionals embed physical activity into their approach to treating patients for common conditions in line with existing National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance.

The resource has been launched at the seventh ISPAH congress in London this week (15 to 17 October 2018), which aims to bring the best minds together to bridge the gap between physical activity research, policy and practice to support healthier nations across the world.

First evidence review of physical activity among disabled adults

New nationally developed resources to support disabled adults to get more physically active were launched at the International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress (ISPAH) in London. These include a first evidence review published by Public Health England and a new UK Chief Medical Officer (CMO) infographic to make physical activity recommendations more accessible and support disabled people.

  • Four in five disabled people report they would like to do more physical activity[i]
  • Yet, disabled adults are twice as likely to be inactive than non-disabled adults, with potentially around 3.5 million disabled adults at greater risk of poor health due to inactivity [ii]
  • New resources support disabled adults to get active to improve their health and make physical activity recommendations more accessible

There are 11.5 million disabled people in England and nearly half (42%) are inactive[1]per week compared to 21% of non-disabled people; a two-fold difference. However, four in five disabled people report they would like to do more physical activity, highlighting continued barriers that prevent them from being active.

Concern around safety is often cited as a major barrier to disabled people undertaking physical activity, but the review has shown that when performed at an appropriate level and intensity, this should not hinder them being more active and will lead to health benefits.

The UK is at the forefront of action to address these inequalities with new nationally developed resources to help disabled adults get more physically active being launched at the International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress (ISPAH) in London today.

These include:

  • a world first evidence review published by Public Health England (PHE) that highlights a critical need for disabled adults to do more physical activity to improve their health; and
  • a new UK Chief Medical Officer (CMO) infographic to make physical activity recommendations more accessible and support disabled people in getting more active.

These works consider the breadth of impairments, covering long term physical, sensory, cognitive, and/or mental health impairments, something never done before in the UK.

They have been developed to address psychological barriers which play the biggest role in preventing disabled people from taking part in physical activity, including the attitudes and perceptions of disabled people and non-disabled people that activity might be unsafe or worsen their impairment.

While national physical activity guidelines are currently produced for the whole population, the new evidence shows there is no risk for disabled people undertaking physical activity.

It is recommended that disabled people build up physical activity, concentrating first on frequency, then duration, before finally raising the intensity level. This is especially significant for those that are not active at all and those with other existing health conditions.

The review shows that being more active will improve their health, including improved fitness, muscle strength, undertaking of everyday tasks (e.g. housework and gardening), wellbeing, and sense of community, as well as reduced risk of diseases such as cardiovascular disease.

Launching PHE’s evidence review at the ISPAH Congress, Duncan Selbie, PHE chief executive, said:

“Moving more is important for everyone and we must better support people who face barriers to being active. We can all find something that suits our needs and abilities from walking, to playing ball games, or joining a gym.”

Alongside the evidence review, the existing UK CMOs’ physical activity guidelines have been made more inclusive of disabled people. An infographic for healthcare professionals and disabled people has been produced that better highlights the benefits and practical steps to getting active to improve health.

The infographic has been developed in collaboration with 350 disabled people, 10 disability organisations and 50 healthcare professionals and is endorsed by the four UK CMOs.

Chief Medical Officer for England, Professor Dame Sally Davies, said: 

“Being active is good for our health – both physical and mental. It is important that disabled people in the UK do not miss out on the benefits that being active can bring. I hope that the new infographic, designed by disabled people for disabled people, will help more people reap the benefits of physical activity in a safe and healthy way.”

ISPAH is co-hosted by PHE and Sport England and co-sponsored by the European network for the promotion of health enhancing physical activity (HEPA Europe) and the World Health Organisation (WHO). It aims to bring the best international minds together to bridge the gap between physical activity research, policy and practice to tackle health inequalities and support healthier nations across the world.

 Visit PHE’s website on www.gov.uk/phe.

The PHE evidence review will be available on PHE’s website

  1. The findings have already been adopted as part of the UK Chief Medical Officer’s (CMO) national physical activity guidelines. The 2019 guidelines will support disabled adults to be more physically active to improve their health.
  2. The majority of disabled people (83%) acquire impairment during their lives, which is why these resources focus on adults.
  3. The majority of impairments are not visible, for example Sport England’s Mapping Disability: The Facts reports that fewer than 1 in 10 (5–7%) of disabled people are in a wheelchair.
  4. Physical inactivity is in the top ten greatest causes of ill health nationally, with negative impacts on physical wellbeing, mental wellbeing, individual development, social and community development, and economic development for individuals and communities.

[1] Inactivity refers to people doing less than 30 minutes of moderate intensity activity per week.

[i] The Activity Trap, Activity Alliance, published 8 October 2018, http://www.activityalliance.org.uk/how-we-help/research/the-activity-trap

[ii] Active Lives Adult Survey May 17/18 report, Sport England, published 11 October 2018, https://www.sportengland.org/media/13558/active-lives-adult-may-2017-18-report.pdf

 

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Cerebral Palsy Sports Awards 2018

On Saturday 6th October we held the 2018 Cerebral Palsy Sports Awards at Harvey Hadden Sports Village in Nottingham.

The following awards were presented:

2018 CPISRA World Games Volunteering Commitment Awards

This award was presented in recognition of the incredible contribution made by our World Games volunteers who supported Team CP England and made an exceptional contribution to supporting all the team.

Awards presented to.. Elaine Morris, Liz Moulam, Ian Clegg, Ian Morris, Jon Moulam and Simon Smith

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Sadly Liz, John and Simon couldn’t attend the evening


2018 CPISRA World Games Team Commitment Awards

Presented to Richard Kerr, Jen Basford and Lisa Morton-Smith

These awards were presented in recognition of our brilliant sport team managers and an awesome Chef de Mission who steered Team CP England to topping the medal table in Spain.

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Fundraiser of the Year

Awarded to Dean Bugler

This award recognises the support, efforts and sheer determination to raise funds for us in unique and often life changing ways. Both finalists ran the Virgin London marathon for Team CP Sport in 2018 and raised a significant amount of money for Cerebral Palsy Sport.

Sarah Harger was also a finalist.

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Young Fundraiser of the Year

Awarded to Zach Nichol

This award recognises the many young fundraisers that take on challenges and special events to raise funds for CP Sport. Our winner is no exception and raised over £1,000 during our Get Set Raise campaign. He has cerebral palsy himself and wanted to inspire others to take up sport.

Unfortunately Zach couldn’t attend the awards, but we will ensure we get his award to him quickly.

Zach Fundraising


Cerebral Palsy Sport Fundraising Supporter of the Year

Awarded to Kevin O’Connor

This award is in recognition of the incredible supporters who fundraises for CP Sport and enable us to make the difference we do. Kevin O’Connor has supported the charity with charity golf days and also coming to swimming events to witness the difference his fundraising makes.

Unfortunately Kevin O’Connor couldn’t attend the awards, but we will be awarding this to him at our Worcester Swimming Gala later this month.

Kevin golf day-02


Cerebral Palsy Sport CEO Recognition Award

Awarded to Nick Lomath

This award is in recognition of an individual who has made a stand out contribution to supporting the charity in our work. Nick Lomath has volunteered his time and tirelessly supported us at many events with his incredible photography and then gifted all the photos to us to help us promote the work we do.

Nick Lomath


Partner of the Year 

Awarded to British Athletics

The Partner of the year award was first included in 2017 to highlight the great partnerships that CP Sport has with key organisations. This years finalists were two National Governing Bodies of Sport who worked closely with Cp Sport to ensure that there are high quality opportunities for people with cerebral palsy to access sport and activity at a local level and developing a pathway that is there for those that want to compete at their highest level. Partner of the Year is awarded to those partners that support Cerebral Palsy Sport in having people with CP and their families at the heart of what they do.

British Gymnastics was also a finalist.

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Swimmer of the Year

Awarded to Samm Lewis

The Swimmer of the Year award recognises a swimmer who has shown dedication, commitment and made significant improvements and achievements over the last year. Samm Lewis has excelled and won multiple medals at the 2018 CPISRA World Games following re-classification.

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The Andrew Stubbs Trophy

Awarded to Catriona Chung

The Andrew Stubbs Trophy recognises a swimmer who over the last 12 months has shown dedication and perseverance enabling them to be the best swimmer that they can be.

The trophy is in remembrance of a very special young man – Andrew Stubbs and we are humbled that his family continue to support Cerebral Palsy Sport and were able to present the trophy.

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The Colin Rains Trophy for Endeavour

Awarded to Thomas Stamp

The Colin Rains Trophy is presented to an athlete who has continually strived to be their best, have shown endeavour, commitment and dedication throughout the 2018 athletics series. Both our finalists, Emily and Thomas have shown all these qualities throughout 2018

Emily Stewart was also a finalist

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Sport Volunteer of the Year

Awarded to Mary Butler

The Sports Volunteer Award is judged on the commitment a volunteer shows to their role, one that goes the extra mile and excels in their volunteering. Our finalists have truly demonstrated all of those attributes over 2018.

Mary devotes all her spare time to disability swimming, it is her lifelong passion. She organises her own inclusive swimming event, to include all disabled swimmers as well as volunteering at all CP Sport galas over the last 5 years. Mary always goes above and beyond what is expected of her, as a gala organiser she always asks coaches and parents about each swimmer before they compete. Any swimmer new to galas she finds somebody experienced to look after them. She even organised her holiday this year to be in Spain during the World Games so she could watch swimmers she had nurtured swim in an international event.

Elaine Morris and Nick Lomath were also finalists

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Coach of the Year

Awarded to Steve McRobie

The Coach of the Year Award recognises the outstanding commitment to developing and mentoring the young people in their care and demonstrates a passion for improving the lives of people with cerebral palsy through sport.

Steve is manager of Bingham Outlaws (Bingham Town Youths FC, Nottinghamshire). He has worked tirelessly and thanklessly for almost 15 years in developing an environment where young people with disabilities (specifically cerebral palsy) can train and play competitive football together. The environment that Steve has created with the Bingham Outlaws is one which the players very rarely leave, players have been with the club for over 10 years and Steve is a big reason for that.

Steve has been instrumental in growing the size of the club over the last 12 months. they now have more players than ever ranging from 8 – 22 years old. Steve puts many hours and days of his own free time into the team. He has always shown the highest level of dedication to helping the players improve and develop not only as footballers, but as people.

Martin Cook and Janet Warrington were also finalists

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Official of the Year

Awarded to Tony Williams

The Official of the Year Award recognises the vitally important role officails play in supporting events and the commitment they bring to volunteers in sport with professionalism, care and inclusion.

Tony has been an official at Cerebral Palsy Sport Athletics events and within athletics for over 40 years. As a starter Tony not only makes sure each race gets off to the right start, he takes time to talk to athletes and provide advice and guidance to those that are new and may be unsure. There is many a nervous athlete who has stood on the start line and been reassured by Tony’s empathy and care. On the odd occasion that Tony has been unavailable for CP Sport events he does all he can to make sure that there is a starter in place. Over the years he has developed some incredible knowledge, something that those around him benefit from a great deal.

Paul Rutter and Wendy Cole were also finalists

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Sports Club of the Year

Awarded to North East and Yorkshire Disability FC

The Sports Club of the Year Award recognises clubs that have a commitment of inclusion, opportunities for all and seeking to lead the way in coach, player and volunteer development.

North East and Yorkshire Disability Football Club has 1 adult CP team who are national champions and a great junior section. All coaches are highly qualified and engage all the players with enthusiasm, knowledge and passion. the club strongly believes in making football accessible for all, particularly for those with CP and through its work in the National League is helping to create pathways into the England CP senior team. The adult CP team won the FA Disability Cup at St George’s Park and since then players have been called up for the England squad and junior development squads. The club are extremely welcoming, they develop footballers whilst having fun, allowing players to make new friends.

London Disability Swimming Club and Gateshead Harriers were also finalists.

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Sports Achiever of the Year

Awarded to Thomas Talbot

The Sports Achiever of the Year Award recognises the outstanding commitment individuals make to participating in their sport. It honours their hard work in training, competition and their achievements over the last 12 months.

Thomas is an international RaceRunner who trains twice a week at his athletics club Lincoln Wellington as well as every other day on his treadmill. Since April 2018, Thomas has run consistently well improving his race pbs including taking 25 seconds off his 400m pb and making massive progress on his 800m pb by over a minute. Thomas came into the season second in Great Britain for all RaceRunners for 800m. In July 2018 he won four Typhoo National Junior Championships titles for Under 15 as well as running pbs. He also took over 19 seconds off his 3k time in July. Thomas was bronze medallist for RR3 100m at the England Athletics /CAU National Disability Championships in July 2018 where RaceRunning featured for the first time.

Thomas represented Team CP England at the CPISRA 2018 World Games in Spain and was reclassified as a RR2 athlete. He won a world silver medal in 800m and ran pb’s in 100m as well as qualifying for all his finals and placed 4th in the 100m, 200m and 400m. he returned from the Games ad the number 1 ranked RR2 athlete in Great Britain. Thomas also won 4 RR2 golds at CP Sport National Athletics Championships as well as running a pb for his 100m.

Thomas has fought back after major hip reconstruction surgery through rehabilitation, learning to walk again and back to full health to enable him to race in the 2018 season. Thomas is also a real ambassador for RaceRunning and is encouraging to other RaceRunners as well as all his team mates. he always cheers them on. He carries himself with humility and quiet dedication to run the best he can with challenging medical circumstances pending.

Cameron Osbourne and Joshua Monaghan-Coombs were also finalists

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Lifetime Achievement Award – Swimming

Awarded to Jill Stidever MBE

Jill has spent over 60 years supporting thousands of children with special needs to learn to swim. Her dedication to swimming has helped in changing the perception of disabled sport and encouraging people to see disabled swimmers as athletes.

Jill dedicates over 40 hours a week to coaching, raising funds and organising swimming programmes and she has seen some of the young children she has coached go on to compete at Paralympic level.

In 2014 Jill was honoured with the BBC Get Inspired Unsung Hero Award and we were delighted to honour her commitment, hard work and dedication to cerebral palsy swimming and disability swimming with this lifetime achievement award.

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Lifetime Achievement Award – Athletics

Awarded to Dr Alan Neuff

Dr Alan Neuff started Neuff Athletic equipment in 1966 by designing the Britain’s fibreglass vaulting poles and it has gradually developed to covering all track and and field events. Dr Alan Neuff has been in athletics as an athlete, coach and official for many years which has included supporting CP Sport events as an official.

Alan is a dedicated official committed to supporting athletes with a disability to achieve their sporting potential. He has complete attention to detail for officiating that many would aspire to and is always alongside his treasured wife Caroline. While serious ill health meant he couldn’t be with us at the awards evening, his wife Caroline and son Ralph collected the award on his behalf.

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Stephen Miller MBE and Graeme Ballard were also inducted into the Cerebral Palsy Sport Hall of Fame, Click here to read more about their induction into the Hall of Fame.

To take a look at all the photos taken at the training day, AGM and awards evening, please click here

The Activity Trap: Benefits or being fit?

New research shows almost half of disabled people fear losing benefits if they take part in exercise.

Almost half of disabled people (47%) fear losing their benefits if they are seen to be physically active, according to new research published by Activity Alliance.

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The research is particularly important as disabled people count for one in five of Britain’s population, almost 14 million people. However, they are currently the least active group in society, and twice as likely as non-disabled people to be inactive.

The study, entitled ‘The Activity Trap: Disabled people’s fear of being active’, shows that four in five disabled people would like to be more active (83%). Respondents’ reasons include that it enables them to manage impairments, pain, and to maintain and improve physical and mental health.

Almost two thirds (65%) of disabled people who participated in the study said they rely on benefits to be active. Without this financial support, they would not be able to afford travel, paid-for exercise and the specialist equipment needed to be active.

However, almost half of those who responded (48%) fear being seen as “too independent” for a disabled person. This could see them lose access to the benefits they need such as the Personal Independence Payment (PIP), Disability Living Allowance (DLA) and the Employment and Support Allowance (ESA).

Some participants in the study told Activity Alliance that they live in fear of having their benefits taken away and worry about being reassessed, even if their reassessment date is years away.

Alan Ringland, is chairman of the Birmingham Ability Counts League, the largest league of disabled footballers in England.Alan, a qualified coach and referee said the league had 455 players three years ago and now only has only 250, with many people dropping out because they have lost benefits after PIP assessment.

The 62-year-old, whose sons both represented England in disability football teams, said: “I’ve seen players who have lost their PIP and aren’t able to attend anymore. When you see them again you see that they’ve not been as active as they were, often they have put on weight and over time their health may deteriorate.

“Playing football on a Sunday was one day where they really enjoyed themselves and if they don’t take part anymore they can lose confidence, friendships, and the camaraderie that goes with that. In many cases, sport is the only regular social activity in their lives, and taking that away can have a massive impact.”

These experiences resonate deeply with former British wheelchair athlete Carly Tait, who has cerebral palsy and took part in the 2016 Rio Paralympics.
Carly, from Wythenshawe in Manchester, was told she would lose her adapted car four months before she was due to fly to Rio for the Paralympics. This came after being assessed for PIP in February of that year.

The 32-year-old, who had access to a car for 12 years under the Motability charity scheme needs the car for work and when in training used to attend two training sessions a day with local club Stockport Harriers.

Now eight months pregnant with her first child, Carly already lives in fear of having to undertake her next PIP assessment in eight years’ time. Carly said: “When I was assessed for PIP in 2016 and found out that I was going to lose my car, the bottom fell out of my world. I was distraught and couldn’t focus on my training – I couldn’t even get around the track without breaking down in tears.“It was an extremely distressing time in my life, and despite the fact that my next assessment is eight years away, it’s already causing me stress just thinking about what might happen.

“Being active means I can manage my disability better; I have more energy, am more confident and all-round I’m a lot happier in myself. Without the financial support that I received, I would never have been able to get myself to training twice a week.“There are enough financial barriers to sport as it is, especially with the high costs of adapted equipment for some disabled people, without the additional fear of losing benefits.

“We need to give all disabled people the same rights to be active that everyone else enjoys – and end the activity trap now.”

Mik Scarlet, 53, has been a wheelchair user since his childhood, after complications from his cancer treatment resulted in paralysis. A TV broadcaster and journalist from Camden, who hosts a video blog on the benefits of sitting yoga, Mik said: “I had an awful experience with the award of my PIPs, which took a year of fighting to resolve and has taken a huge emotional toll. While my yoga blog has generally been well received, quite a few disabled people have contacted me saying they’d be concerned about trying it – in case they were considered fit enough to either work or receive a lower level of financial support.

“The Activity Trap report highlights the desperate situation for far too many disabled people in this country.”

Andy Dalby-Welsh, Deputy Chief Executive of Activity Alliance said: “Disabled people deserve the same right to be active as everybody else, no matter whether they want to make use of their local gym or become an elite athlete. But the stark reality is that disabled people are still twice as likely as non-disabled people to be inactive. This needs to change.“That is why this rigorous, evidenced report has such an important role to play in changing the reality of disability, inclusion and sport. We need to understand the challenges and barriers that disabled people face on a daily basis.“The numbers within the report, although shocking, give us a starting point for change. We want to work with and across government to make active lives for disabled people possible. We would urge policy makers within national and local Government to take on board the calls for action within this report and the spirit with which it was written. Let’s enable more disabled people to lead happier and healthier lives.”

Disabled people can find out more about the benefits of being active, who to contact and ideas on where and how to get started on Activity Alliance website, visit www.activityalliance.org.uk/get-active 
To download a copy of the report: http://www.activityalliance.org.uk/news/4430-the-activity-trap-benefits-or-being-fit

Cerebral Palsy Sport inducts Paralympians into Hall of Fame

Paralympic athletes Stephen Miller MBE and Graeme Ballard have been inducted into Cerebral Palsy Sport Hall of Fame at our Awards evening on 6th October 2018 – World Cerebral Palsy Day.

Stephen Miller MBE

Stephen has represented Great Britain for over 20 years, competing in 6 Paralympic Games, 7 World Championships and 6 European Championships – so far winning 28 international medals. He has won 3 Paralympic titles in a row and held the F32 Club Throw world record from 1997-2008 and more recently he has just won a bronze medal at the IPC European Championships in Italy in June 2016 and he was honoured in the 2016 New Years Honours List by Her Majesty the Queen with an MBE.

In July 2016 Stephen was named as part of the Great Britain team for the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games and brought home a truly well deserved Bronze medal.

Stephen  has had a fabulous 2018 season and kicked it off in fine still with a season best throw of 30.11m to win gold  at the 2018 World Para Athletics Dubai Athletics Grand Prix. He ended the season with an incredible Silver medal at the World Para Athletics European Championships in Berlin.

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Ali Talbot, CEO of Cerebral Palsy Sport said of Stephen:

“Stephen is a true ambassador for para athletics, club throwing and for Cerebral Palsy Sport. Stephen still takes part in our athletics series events and is incredibly encouraging  to younger athletes who may be starting their sporting journey or taking part in an event for the first time. He is a truly respectful competitor and always acknowledges the contribution the officials and volunteers give to our events. We are delighted to bestow this honour of being inducted into our Hall of Fame in 2018 and it is so well deserved”.

Speaking of his  Cerebral Palsy Sport Hall of Fame award, Stephen said:

“It was CP Sport that helped me to get into sport and they provided me with my earliest opportunities on my sporting journey, so to receive this award is a truly proud moment for me. I know how important sport is for people with cerebral palsy, and I hope others can take inspiration from my story and have their own sporting journey. As always I have to dedicate this award to all those that have supported me, especially my parents who are my heroes.”

Emily Stewart collected Stephen’s award on his behalf.

 


Graeme Ballard

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It is fitting in the year where Graeme hung up his competitive spikes after 14 years of international para athletics, that we honour him with the Hall of Fame award.

After taking up athletics at the age of 19 through a Cerebral Palsy Sport athletics event, Graeme’s para athletics career has gone from strength to strength.

Graeme first ran the Cerebral Palsy Sport nationals in September 1999 and has been a member of CP since then. He competed at CPISRA games in 2001 and gained 3 medals  – 2 individual medals and 1 relay.

His roll of achievements are recorded as:

  • 2002 World Championships in Lille 1 Bronze medal
  • 2003 European Championships in Assen 2 silver and 1 bronze
  • 2004 Paralympic Games in Athens  – won 1 bronze
  • 2005 Combined World & European Championships in Espoo – won 2 Gold medals and 1 recognised for World and 1 for European
  • 2006 World Championships in Assen – won 1 Silver
  • 2012 European Championships in  Holland – won 1 silver 1 bronze
  • 2012 Broke the world record 11.98 and won Paralympics Silver medal
  • 2013 World  Championships – won 1 Bronze
  • 2014 European Championships in Swansea – 2 Silvers
  • 2016 European Championships in Grossetto 2 silver

Although Graeme missed out on medals in 2008 and 2016 he was still a member of the British Para Athletics  team and also a member of the team at the World Championships in Christchurch, Doho and London where he came in 4th at all three competitions only just missing out on the medals.

In August 2018 Graeme won an incredible Gold medal at the World Para Athletics European Championships in Berlin for the  T36 100m with a season’s best time of 12.32 seconds seeing him ease to the line clear of the rest of the field.

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Speaking of Graeme’s achievements, Ali Talbot CEO of Cerebral Palsy Sport said:

” We are delighted to be able to honour Graeme’s remarkable para athletics career and all his achievements by inducting into our Hall of Fame. Graeme is a true ambassador for para athletics and he supports so many of our SportStart events to inspire and encourage children and young people with cerebral palsy by sharing his message. He also supports our National Athletics Championships by coming along and presenting medals to younger athletes who aspire to achieve what he has. We wish Graeme well as he hangs up his international competitive spikes and we look forward to supporting him in his next endeavours”.

Graeme spoke of his pride of receiving this honour. He said:

“It is a great honour and a privilege to be nominated into the Hall of Fame. I hope that I can do justice to the role and look forward to seeing everyone at weekend.”

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A hole in one for CP Golf

Stockport CP Society with the support of England Golf have recently organised a CP Golf day. The day gave people with Cerebral Palsy the opportunity to give golf a go. The event took place on Friday 14th September at Heaton Moor Golf Club.

CP Sport have been working with England Golf to raise the awareness of golfing opportunities for people with CP and associated physical impairments. Despite your disability there is a golf opportunity for you, if you would like to get involved visit

https://www.englandgolf.org/page.aspx?sitesectionid=1284&sitesectiontitle=Disability+Golf

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