EFDS resources take people on road to an active lifestyle

The English Federation of Disability Sport (EFDS) have launched a new resource to support those who are new to sport or want to assist disabled people on how to get more active. Produced in partnership with County Sports Partnership Network, Disability Rights UK and Sport England,  the resource is a guideline to where to start, where to find out more and who to contact on the road to being active.

EFDS is aware from previous research that one barrier can be awareness of opportunities or places to go to find out more. Despite the increase in various activities around the country, there continues to be fear factors around whether it would be accessible or suitable for disabled individuals.

With this in mind, EFDS has created two resources. The first is for people supporting disabled people to be active, for example, local charities or healthcare. The second is similar but for those taking part in the Sainsbury’s Inclusive Community Training. The roadmap helps people to access some of the right contacts, places and resources.

Ray Ashley, Head of Engagement at EFDS, said:

“When supporting disabled people to be active, we understand there is a lot to learn and find out. Knowing where to start can be tricky because there are many organisations, opportunities and resources out there. These resources can help to direct more people, who may have little knowledge on sport or active recreation, in a quick and easy way. We also hope they also assist more disabled people to reap the huge benefits of being active.”

Chloe Studley, Active Kids for All Programme Manager, said:

“Through the Sainsbury’s Inclusive Community Training, we are privileged to meet so many people who want to make a difference in their own work or their communities. However, we are very aware that some attendees finish the training with lots of enthusiasm but often need to refer to their notes, so this works well as that reference guide.”

Leanne Wightman, Get Yourself Active Project Manager at Disability Rights UK, said:

“At Disability Rights UK we are well aware of the many challenges disabled people face when trying to participate equally in society. Being active is an important part of this but disabled people have told us that it’s hard to know where to start on the journey to being more active and living a good life. It is important that disabled people and their supporters have access to the right information and guidance about local opportunities to be active as well as being able to physically access these opportunities. The roadmap is great for individuals, groups and organisations who are just starting out on their journey into the world of physical activity and sport and who need a nudge in the right direction.”

Mike Diaper, Executive Director at Sport England, said:

“We are pleased to help the English Federation of Disability Sport realise their vision of enabling disabled people to be active for life. Currently a disabled person is only half as likely to play sport as a non-disabled person. We believe these new resources will enable greater numbers of disabled people to become active, and enjoy sport and physical activity as a practical, healthy and fun lifestyle choice.”

Statistics continually show low numbers of active disabled people – still half as likely to be active as non-disabled people. These resources follow a range of guides to engagement released in December 2016, including a short animation film to access top tips.

To access the Sainsbury’s Inclusive Community Training roadmap resource please contact the Active Kids for All team on email AK4A@efds.co.uk or telephone 01509 227751.

Download EFDS roadmap to supporting more disabled people to be active.

 

Working towards better support for volunteers with a disability

Cerebral Palsy Sport is working with the English Federation of Disability Sport (EFDS) and the other National Disability Sports Organisations (NDSOs) to understand how to better support people with a range of disabilities to volunteer.

Revealing Reality is a research company undertaking the research and they are looking for some people speak to about their experiences or interest in volunteering.

Revealing Reality are happy to offer £25 cash / donation (to Cerebral Palsy Sport) to say thank you for your time.

If you volunteer now, either with Cerebral Palsy Sport and/or another organisation; or used to / want to volunteer and would be happy to speak to a researcher about your experiences and thoughts please get in touch!

Please email info@cpsport.org and we can send you the links to take part in the research.

 

Thank you!

 

Typhoo and EFDS tea-m up in 2017 to support disabled athletes

Typhoo and the national charity the English Federation of Disability Sport (EFDS) have teamed up again in 2017 to provide disabled athletes with more sporting opportunities to compete across England. It will be the third year that Typhoo will add an extra ‘OO’ to the National Junior Athletics Championships and nine regional qualifiers, aiming to increase the number of disabled people in athletics.

Every year 1400 disabled athletes take part in this particular athletics programme across England. In 2017, the tea company is brewing up again with EFDS’s events programme to ensure more disabled athletes have access to local and national competition.

Disabled athletes will be part of the regional qualifiers that lead to the Typhoo National Junior Athletics Championships climax on 1-2 July. Over 200 12-20 year olds will take part at Warwick Athletics Stadium, where spectators can spot future stars among competitors.

Somnath Saha, CEO of Typhoo Tea, said:

“Sports unites people and, at Typhoo, bringing communities together is an important part of what we do. Supporting the EFDS again this year, we look forward to providing more opportunities for young disabled people to compete at a high level as part of our ongoing Sports for All programme.”

Barry Horne, Chief Executive for EFDS, said:

“It is fantastic to be working with Typhoo for a third year. This is a much-loved programme and every year we enjoy seeing how many people get involved in this athletics programme, whether taking part or volunteering. Typhoo’s support means we can ensure more disabled people can reap the benefits of an active lifestyle.”

For over 25 years, the national event has provided thousands of young disabled athletes with the opportunity to develop their talent and compete against others from across the country. The full track and field programme means athletes with a wide range of impairments can take part- something, which many events do not regularly offer.

Many elite disabled athletes began their golden careers at the national event. Paralympians Hannah Cockroft, Hollie Arnold, Shelly Woods and Aled Davies were once junior participants who moved up the ranks to become world-class athletes.

Teams of dedicated volunteers deliver regional events, which drive the athletes’ ambition to qualify at the nationals. This makes it highly competitive for the team trophy at the national event. Also supporting the event is the Lions Club International, a long-term supporter of the junior athletics programme who continually give up their time and energy to raise funds.

Regional events begin in April across the English regions. More information about the Typhoo Regional and National Championships will be available on EFDS’s website. Find the regional events here.

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Photo credit: EFDS and Simon Coates

 

For further information on Cerebral Palsy Sports Athletics and National Athletics Championships please click here.

 

Sainsbury’s Inclusive Community Training awareness week: Communities reaping benefits of active lives

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Over three years, more than 7,000 people have benefitted from Sainsbury’s Inclusive Community Training. As a result, tens of thousands of disabled people are leading a more active lifestyle. The programme is reaching its final six months of this funding cycle and the English Federation of Disability Sport (EFDS) is using an awareness week to celebrate the successes so far. From 6-13 April, join us in promoting the value of this training in communities across England.

Support more disabled people to lead active lives in your community

From Thursday 6 April, EFDS will be sharing stories, videos and more from Sainsbury’s Inclusive Community Training on Twitter and Facebook. Each day, the stories will focus on how the training has made a real difference to disabled people, volunteers, support workers, community organisations and healthcare professionals.

How you can get involved

  • Individuals and organisations can show their support by signing up to our Thunderclap. With your help, we can blast the important training message across social media on Thursday 13 April.
  • Share our stories on social media using the programme hashtag #AK4A
  • Perhaps you have taken part in a workshop. Share your stories with us – it would be great to know more!
  • Sign up for a workshop using the contact information below.

 

“A unique opportunity to up-skill those at the heart of our communities”

Barry Horne, Chief Executive of EFDS, said:

“EFDS exists to make active lives possible for disabled people so we’re really keen to get more people in every community feeling confident and skilled at including everyone in activities. The Inclusive Community Training is a unique opportunity to up-skill those who are at the heart of our local communities.

“There are many people working or volunteering in local areas, who would benefit from the additional knowledge that this training provides. They often play a major role in influencing more disabled people to be active, whether in their own groups or by setting up new sessions. This week puts a spotlight on the tremendous opportunities available around the country.”

Sainsbury’s Inclusive Community Training is delivered by EFDS in partnership with sports coach UK. Mark Gannon, CEO of sports coach UK, added:

“Sports coach UK is delighted to have worked in partnership with EFDS on the Inclusive Community programme since 2013, leading to over 7,000 individuals taking part in the training. This programme will leave a legacy of well-trained confident volunteers and support workers inspiring continued participation within the disabled community who, while having lots of fun and being involved socially, will also benefit from the long-term health benefits being physically active brings.”

Lisa O’Keefe, Director of Insight at Sport England said:

“The Sainsbury’s Inclusive Community Training has equipped thousands of people with the knowledge and confidence to help disabled people be more active. This training reaches the people that are likely to have a supporting role in the disabled person’s life, provides them with guidance on options and possibilities for an active life, so they can not only encourage disabled people to be active but also be confident the activity is relevant and suitable.

“This is part of our commitment and ambition for everyone, regardless of their age, background or level of ability, to feel able to engage in sport and physical activity.”

More information

The Sainsbury’s Inclusive Community Training Programme is a unique opportunity that improves knowledge, competence and confidence of those that work and support disabled people in delivering sport-based activities. It is aimed at people or organisations that represent the community, have direct access or contact with disabled people or have the opportunity to introduce physical activity and sport to disabled people.

The training consists of a three-hour practical workshop, supported by online materials and costs a maximum of £10 per participant, although subsidies may apply.

To find out about workshops in your area or to arrange one yourself, email AK4A@efds.co.uk or telephone 01509 227751.

Participants needed for new activity research project

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Can you help the University of Birmingham? They’re looking for disabled people who are interested in becoming more physically active to take part in a new research project about sport and exercise.Led by the University of Birmingham, this project is supported by the National Disability Sports Organisations and English Federation of Disability Sport.

National Learning Disability Tennis Championships - Wrexham - Oct '16. Celebration. High Fives. Joy.

Who are they looking for to take part in this research project?

  • People over 18 years of age
  • People who are currently not doing any physical activity but would like to become active

People within the following impairment groups:

  • People who are deaf or hard of hearing
  • People who have cerebral palsy
  • Amputees and people with a limb impairment
  • People with restricted growth or dwarfism

 

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What would be involved?

To start with  – to help understand how you can be supported to get active and have fun!

Stage One
Supporting you to be more active. Meet to discuss what physical activity you would like to do and invite you to two workshops which will give you ideas on how to get started and stay active. Support you to complete a 30 week activity programme.

Stage Two
Meet with you again and find how you are getting on with the activity programme and if you are still active. Talk about how you could have been helped and supported better during the activity.

The University of Birmingham will reimburse you for all transport costs throughout the project, and as thank you for taking part in the research you’ll receive £30 on completion of the project.

How can I join the project?

There are a few places remaining at upcoming workshop session in:

London – Saturday 4 February

Birmingham – Tuesday 7 February

Manchester – Saturday 11 February

If you are interested in taking part in the project and would like more details please contact Eva Jaarsma at the University of Birmingham. You can email Eva or call 0121 414 8258.

More people to ‘Get Out Get Active’ as programme goes lives across UK

1st October 2016 marked the start of the Get Out Get Active (GOGA) programme. Spirit of 2012 is funding the £4.5 million initiative, which brings together 18 GOGA localities in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales and numerous national partners. In the first of its kind on such a scale, GOGA will support disabled and non-disabled people to enjoy being active together. Developed to get some of the UK’s least active people moving more, GOGA will concentrate on fun and inclusive activities delivered over three-years.

Earlier this year, Spirit of 2012 – a funding charity, established with a £47m endowment from the Big Lottery Fund, awarded the programme to the UK wide consortium. Spirit fund partners across the UK that provide opportunities in sports, physical activity, arts and culture, volunteering and social action.

The English Federation of Disability Sport (EFDS) is the lead GOGA partner, teaming up with an extensive range of organisations to help reach more people, who have the greatest need to get out and get active. These partners offer in-depth local knowledge and national expertise. The other home nation disability sport organisations are backing the programme as well as Volunteering Matters, Disability Rights UK, Women and Sport, Sporting Equals and Age UK. Additional partners include National Governing Bodies of sport and national charities. Recently, one hundred people involved in GOGA met in Manchester for the first group conference to start the programme’s journey.

Debbie Lye, Chief Executive for Spirit of 2012 said:

“Get Out Get Active launches today after months of careful planning.  It’s a very ambitious initiative designed to increase physical and mental wellbeing by supporting physically inactive people around the UK to improve their health.

“We want to make getting active appealing, accessible, fun and inclusive for people of all ages and abilities. Spirit of 2012 is funding Get Out Get Active in response to overwhelming evidence that inactive people need encouragement and support to take those first steps into active, healthy lifestyles.”

Barry Horne, Chief Executive for EFDS said:

“It is a powerful proposition- to get so many more people out and active and we are proud to be leading on such a major investment. The programme has the potential to change how we encourage, enable and engage more people through active recreation opportunities.

“For many of those we are trying to attract, these opportunities have been out of reach or unappealing. Changing people’s mindsets is not an overnight solution and that’s why we’ve called upon so many partners to help make it happen. Today marks the start of an exciting journey for all involved.”

Statistics continually show disabled people to be the least active population and two thirds of disabled people stated they wanted to take part with non-disabled people in EFDS’s Lifestyle Report 2013. Inclusion will be at the heart of the programme through activity and volunteering.

Working together, the partners aim to increase the number of people who are able to access and enjoy local opportunities. This could be through local authority or independent provision, sports clubs or perhaps volunteering. Providers want to motivate people by tapping into their values and the things that matter most to them. This includes building friendships, maintaining health, having fun and progressing in life.

Importantly, a large proportion of the investment is for monitoring and evaluation, assessing the impact and allowing for more organisations to learn from the outcomes.

For more information on Get Out Get Active, visit www.efds.co.uk/GOGA  

 

Will Mellor motivates disabled people in Birmingham to be more active

 

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Well known actor and campaign ambassador Will Mellor visited Villa Rockets Powerchair Football Club in Birmingham on 31st August 2016, to raise awareness of Together We Will – campaign that aims to encourage and motivate disabled people, along with their friends and family to be more active.

The Together We Will campaign looks to address the low number of disabled people who regularly take part in sport or exercise as highlighted in the most recent Sport England Active People Survey.

Eight National Disability Sports Organisations (NDSOs) are working together with the English Federation of Disability Sport (EFDS) to deliver the Together We Will campaign, with backing from Sport England.

In Birmingham, around 200,000 people have an impairment or long-term health condition. The city currently has low numbers of active disabled people, with only 13.5% of disabled people reportedly taking part in sport or physical activity for the recommended 30 minutes per week.

Campaign ambassador, Will Mellor hosted a football game with the Villa Rockets Powerchair Football Club at the Doug Ellis Sports Centre. Demonstrating how people with a range of impairments and of all abilities can get involved with the beautiful game. The event hopes to engage and motivate disabled people across the Midlands to get moving, whatever the activity.

The event reflects insights showing that disabled people are keen to involve family and friends when being active. Fun is also highlighted as a key motivator for disabled people to be active.

Speaking about the campaign, Will Mellor said:

“I’m proud to be part of this campaign which aims to encourage disabled people to be more active. It’s about everyone coming together to have fun and become healthier.

 “My sister had Marfan’s syndrome which affected her physically as well as with her learning. She sadly passed away in 2013, but I recall fondly how much we loved being active as a family together. Therefore, I’m really looking forward to meeting our ambassadors and hearing their stories. We can all make a positive change and support more people to reap the benefits of an active lifestyle.”

Will joins local Midlands campaign ambassadors Amir Ali, coach and captain of the Villa Rockets Powerchair Football Club, and football fan Jude Liversage at the event.

Amir Ali from Birmingham, who has dystrophic dwarfism and scoliosis, is coach and captain of Villa Rockets Powerchair Football Club, established by Aston Villa FC. When he not playing in the Premiership Wheelchair Football League, Amir dedicates his spare time to supporting disabled people of ages to be more active. By providing opportunities for people to play football and enjoy other activities at the club and by running after school initiatives in the local area.

Jude, eight, who has cerebral palsy has always had a passion for sport and has been supported by his family to stay active. When Jude was four, his dad Tony sought the advice of Cerebral Palsy Sport (CP Sport) to find a local opportunity for Jude to play football. After joining a dedicated league, they set up their own Frame Football team in Staffordshire.

Lisa O’Keefe, Director of Insight of Sport England, on behalf of all the campaign partners, said:

“We know that disabled people are half as likely to be active as non-disabled people. The National Disability Sports Organisations work with the sector to provide opportunities for a range of impairment groups to address this issue and encourage inactive people to get in to sport and physical activity.

 “That’s why campaigns, like Together We Will, are so important. We need to put people and what they want and need at the very heart of everything we do. That includes supporting people to get active in places where they want to take part, in activities they want do and with people they want to be active with.

“We’re really excited about this campaign and are looking forward to working with all the National Disability Sports Organisations to help more disabled people to get active this summer.”

Together We Will campaign shares first-hand experiences from people with different impairments or health conditions, about why being active is important to them. It also brings together useful information and support from the NDSOs on how and where you can begin getting active. As research highlighted that often disabled people do not know where to go to find the right information about opportunities available to them.

These stories all share a common theme – how being active has supported them to be healthier and stronger, while having fun along the way. NDSOs and EFDS will share disabled people’s experiences of sport and exercise, so others can learn more from the information and make choices about the activities they want to try.

The campaign will run from July to September, as the nation embraces a summer of sport.

Activity organisers and providers can be involved in Together We Will.  Encourage disabled people to take part in your events and share the local support available to disabled people looking to be more active on social media using #TogetherWeWill.

Next month, Birmingham Disability Sports Forum will also host its annual Birmingham Inclusive Sports Fest (BISF) from Saturday 17th to Sunday 25th September.

Coinciding with the Paralympic Games in Rio, the festival will deliver opportunities for disabled people and their family and friends to take part in inclusive sport and physical activity taster sessions. Find out more about the Festival visit Sport Birmingham website www.sportbirmingham.org.

For more information about Together We Will and support on how you can be more active, visit the joint campaign page www.efds.co.uk/together.

Join the conversation on social media using #TogetherWeWill and share your personal stories and photos of being active this summer.

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New research finds demand for more disability sport news

With a week to go before the Rio Paralympics, new research from the English Federation of Disability Sport (EFDS) has shown the public’s desire to see more disability sport in the media. With many media channels set to cover elite disability sport at the Rio Paralympics, the report flags the importance of coverage beyond the Games and on a par with non-disabled people in sport. To support journalists and those who provide news content on disabled people in sport, EFDS is also releasing a better practice Guide to accompany the research.

To produce the Media Research Report, EFDS commissioned ComRes, who spoke to disabled people, non-disabled people and sports journalists from local, national and specialist outlets. As well as benchmarking media’s current portrayal of disabled people in sport, it assesses opinions on disability sport news. The key findings show:

  • The way the media reports on disabled people in sport has a societal impact and has wider effects on people’s perceptions of disability.
  • Despite the notable improvement in reporting since London 2012, disabled and non-disabled people want to see more disability sport coverage and parity with non-disabled people in sport.
  • There needs to be long-term efforts to improve the media coverage in-between Paralympic years to have a lasting impact for all disabled people in sport. While this is a high profile year for disability sport, there is an opportunity to shape coverage beyond the Paralympics.
  • Journalists and sports providers need more support and guidance on appropriate reporting.

For journalists and news providers, there were some key messages:

  • A number of groups can contribute to improving media coverage of disability sport and play an active role. They include journalists, news providers, National Governing Bodies of sport, sports clubs and ambassadors.
  • Priorities should be to:
    • Focus on achievement rather than disability
    • Avoid overly using terms such as “inspirational”
    • Clearly explain classification systems, recognising disability, but not dwelling on it
    • Use higher quality images, especially for local events.

The accompanying Guide supports journalists and sports providers to produce news content on disabled people in sport. It explores six areas- tailoring content, story type, style and placement, language, media formats and ambassadors.

Last week (25 August), EFDS and ComRes hosted an exclusive event for journalists and key stakeholders in sport. Those present included BBC, Sky Sports News, CP Sport and Sport England. The hosts presented the findings, followed by a panel discussion including David Walker, Sports Editor at the Daily Mirror and Tim Hollingsworth, the British Paralympic Association’s Chief Executive.

 Speaking at the event in London Barry Horne, Chief Executive at EFDS, said:

“The news we consume can affect everyone’s perceptions of themselves as people and, for the talented few in sport, as athletes. This means that it is particularly important that coverage is positive if it is going to encourage disabled people to access opportunities and take part. That is why we all have an obligation to improve our reporting and articles about disabled people in sport.

“Although we are well placed to support journalists and sports providers before the most recognised event in disability sport, the Paralympics, it is paramount that, all year round, we address the issues raised.”

Sport England, the Sports Journalists’ Association and the British Paralympic Association are supporting EFDS with the new research and Guide.

Lisa O’Keefe, Director of Insight at Sport England said:

“While undoubtedly a fantastic showcase of heights which can be achieved, the Paralympics only show one half of the disability sports’ story, with many disabled people playing sport far away from the glare of the Paralympic flame.

“Encouragingly, research shows that there is overwhelming support for seeing more coverage. What’s more, both disabled and non-disabled people agree that the reporting of sport and physical activity for disabled people has improved greatly over the last ten years, which leaves us with a strong platform to build on.”

Andy Elliott, Chair at the Sports Journalists’ Association, said:

“It’s gratifying to know that as an industry we have improved since 2012 and that the majority of articles that report on sport for disabled people use positive language. But the research makes it clear that more can be done.

“The Sports Journalists’ Association is delighted to play its part in supporting EFDS and this important Guide will help sports journalists maintain momentum to increase coverage of disability sports at all levels.”

Together We Will… get stronger

Together We Will ….get stronger

Whatever your impairment or health condition, being active is good for you in so many ways. It can reduce your risk of major illnesses, stress and depression and boost your self-esteem, energy levels as well as make you feel stronger both physically and mentally. The campaign partners for Together We Will have released five top tips to support and encourage disabled people, their friends and family to be more active and get stronger.

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This summer, Together We Will is encouraging disabled people to become healthier, stronger and have fun being active with friends and family.

As part of the campaign, the National Disability Sports Organisations (NDSOs) and English Federation of Disability Sport (EFDS) have published five tip tops to support disabled people on their way to be more active and become stronger – whether that’s physically or mentally, or both.

Together We Will…get stronger five top tips are:

  1. Choose an activity that gets you moving. It doesn’t have to be a competitive sport, just something that gets your heart going a little.
  2. Don’t fear taking part and getting involved with other people. Take a friend or family member with you – there’s strength in numbers.
  3. Take it steady, you’ll soon start to feel stronger in lots of ways. It can help with flexibility, strength, co-ordination and balance.
  4. Replace negative thoughts with positive ones so that you don’t become overwhelmed and can reach your full potential.
  5. Remember, it’s not all about being physically strong. Being active is great for your mental strength and can boost your confidence too.

The Together We Will campaign is brought to you by the NDSOs and EFDS, with backing from Sport England. It looks to address the low number of disabled people who regularly take part in sport or exercise as highlighted in the most recent Sport England Active People Survey.

According to Sport England’s Active People Survey (2016) disabled people are currently half as likely to be active as non-disabled people. As one in five people in England have an impairment or long-term health condition, disabled people make up a large proportion of everyone’s community.

Other insight shows that disabled people are keen to involve family and friends when being active – so there’s strength in numbers. Fun is also highlighted as a key motivator, and we all know that exercising is more fun when we take part together.

In addition to Together We Will get stronger top tips, we’ve also created a handy frequently asked questions (FAQs) guide to being active. So if you’re not sure how being active can help you, or don’t know where to start, click here to read Together We Will be more active FAQs.

Together We Will runs from July to September, as the nation embraces a summer of sport. Over the summer NDSOs and EFDS will share disabled people’s experiences of sport and exercise, so others can learn more from the information and make choices about the activities they want to try.

For more information about Together We Will and support on how you can be more active, visit the joint campaign page

Membership news – Join us today!

In conjunction with the launch of the Together We Will Campaign, announced by the English Federation of Disability Sport today, we are offering automatic affiliate membership to everyone who signs up to our FREE regular emailed newsletter.

You do need an email address to take up this offer – sign up here.

At Cerebral Palsy Sport we are supporting people with cerebral palsy to reach their sporting potential. We want to get more people active, promote inclusion and support people with cerebral palsy and other physical disabilities to play, participate and enjoy sport and active recreation. We aim to achieve this through providing innovative and meaningful projects that enable choice, reduce barriers and promote partnership working with local communities.

For exclusive benefits including discount for our events you can become a full member of CP Sport. For details of our membership packages please click here.

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