ASA offer free disability swimming taster sessions

The ASA have a number of disability swimming taster sessions coming up this month, they are FREE to attend, all ages welcome.

14th Feb: Ferndown, Dorset

15th Feb: Weymouth, Dorset

15th Feb: Dorchester, Dorset

16th Feb: Barnstable, Devon

18th Feb: Ludlow, Shropshire

19th Feb: Leominster, Shropshire

 

Following the event, the ASA will then be able to sign post participants to further learn to swim/clubs or other swimming opportunities in the area.

Parents and carers are welcome to swim alongside swimmers should they need it, and swimming aids can be used.

All of the venues have deep water.

Booking can be made by contacting Dave White on email or phone:

Dave.white@swimming.org  or 07584025154

The Tennis Foundation offer more opportunities to ‘Come and Try’ Tennis!

In 2017 the Tennis Foundation is running a number of camps and ‘Come and Try’ events in order to encourage more disabled people to try out tennis and reap the numerous benefits that the sport can bring. Specific wheelchair and learning disability tennis camps are running, as well as Visually Impaired and Deaf tennis sessions.

2015 Tennis Foundation Wheelchair Nationals and Development Series Finals National Learning Disability Tennis Championships - Wrexham - Oct '16. Celebration. High Fives. Joy.

Cerebral Palsy Sport works in partnership with the Tennis Foundation and our Ambassador,  James Shaw is a GB Wheelchair Tennis player.

 

 

The below outlines some of the upcoming opportunities this year:

 Wheelchair Tennis Camps

If you currently play wheelchair tennis and want to learn new skills and develop your technique under the guidance of a Performance Coach then the Wheelchair Tennis Camps are for you! The four hour camp (£15) will be led by the Tennis Foundation’s Talent ID Coach who will provide useful tips and advice on how to develop your game. The camps are also an opportunity to be talent spotted and if you impress the Talent ID Coach there may be the potential to join the Performance Development Squad! Camps are open to those aged 5 and above, with all equipment provided. For more details and to book on please visit www.tennisfoundation.org.uk/play-tennis/physically-impaired-tennis.

Learning Disability Tennis Camps:

If you have a learning disability and want to get involved in tennis then a great way to get started in the game is to come along to one of our one-day tennis camps for those new to the game or looking to learn new skills. You can expect a day full of fun and friendship, at the end of which you’ll be able to play tennis. All camps are 11am-5pm, cost £15 and all equipment is provided. They are open to anyone aged 5 years or above. For more information please visit www.tennisfoundation.org.uk/play-tennis/learning-disability-tennis.

Wheelchair Tennis Come and Try Sessions:

If you have a physical disability and want to get involved in wheelchair tennis then the new Come and Try sessions are perfect for you. A brilliant way for you to get started in the sport these sessions are for new players who have never tried the sport before. With qualified coaches on hand and all equipment provided there’s no reason not to get involved www.tennisfoundation.org.uk/play-tennis/physically-impaired-tennis.

2015 Tennis Foundation Wheelchair Nationals and Development Series Finals

For more information on Cerebral Palsy Sports partnerships with governing bodies visit http://www.cpsport.org/partnerships-matter/sporting-bodies/

 

 

 

 

BWAA offer winter athletics training opportunity

The British Wheelchair Athletic Association are now offering winter training during the off-season to Seated Throwers who are in training.

Cerebral Palsy Sport join forces with the BWAA every year as part of the CP Sport Athletics Series to provide competitive opportunities. We can now offer their training weekends to our network.

The dates below are for Seated Throwers interested in doing more training. The cost is £5. All of the training weekends will be at Stoke Mandeville Stadium, Aylesbury, HP21 9PP.

BWAA- Seated Thrower training opportunities

November 19th/20th

December 17th/18th  ( Grand prix presentation and Christmas meal)

January 14th/15th

February 11th/12th

March 11th/12th

For more information regarding the BWAA winter training please contact Rachel Ward: Rachel.ward@cpsport.org

Date for the diary: Cerebral Palsy Sport will be putting on a Track and Field Training camp on the 11th February 2017, keep checking our events page for more information.

 

 

Cerebral Palsy Sport 2016 Award Winners Announced

To mark  our 15th Year Anniversary of our inception as an independent charity, we are hosting our Charity Awards as part of our Annual General Meeting.

The awards take place today – October 30th 2016 at 4.00pm at Harvey Hadden Sports Village, Wigman Road, Nottingham, NG8 4PB.

We are delighted to announce the recipients of the 2016 Awards are:

Young Fundraiser of the Year – Joe Yates

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Fundraiser of the Year  – Andrea Burnand

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Fundraising Volunteer of the Year – Ian Clegg

Sports Volunteer of the Year –  Stella Lockwood

Sports Volunteer of the Year – Richard Mee

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Young Achiever of the Year – Athletics – Clare Hands

Young Achiever of the Year – Football – Ned Tranmer

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Young Achiever of the Year – Swimming – Ella Greatorex

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Contribution to Sport – Dave Winter

Partner of the Year – Quest 88

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Lifetime Achievement Award – Doug Williamson

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All our award winners will receive their awards from our Chairman Mr Paul Goodman.

More people to ‘Get Out Get Active’ as programme goes lives across UK

1st October 2016 marked the start of the Get Out Get Active (GOGA) programme. Spirit of 2012 is funding the £4.5 million initiative, which brings together 18 GOGA localities in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales and numerous national partners. In the first of its kind on such a scale, GOGA will support disabled and non-disabled people to enjoy being active together. Developed to get some of the UK’s least active people moving more, GOGA will concentrate on fun and inclusive activities delivered over three-years.

Earlier this year, Spirit of 2012 – a funding charity, established with a £47m endowment from the Big Lottery Fund, awarded the programme to the UK wide consortium. Spirit fund partners across the UK that provide opportunities in sports, physical activity, arts and culture, volunteering and social action.

The English Federation of Disability Sport (EFDS) is the lead GOGA partner, teaming up with an extensive range of organisations to help reach more people, who have the greatest need to get out and get active. These partners offer in-depth local knowledge and national expertise. The other home nation disability sport organisations are backing the programme as well as Volunteering Matters, Disability Rights UK, Women and Sport, Sporting Equals and Age UK. Additional partners include National Governing Bodies of sport and national charities. Recently, one hundred people involved in GOGA met in Manchester for the first group conference to start the programme’s journey.

Debbie Lye, Chief Executive for Spirit of 2012 said:

“Get Out Get Active launches today after months of careful planning.  It’s a very ambitious initiative designed to increase physical and mental wellbeing by supporting physically inactive people around the UK to improve their health.

“We want to make getting active appealing, accessible, fun and inclusive for people of all ages and abilities. Spirit of 2012 is funding Get Out Get Active in response to overwhelming evidence that inactive people need encouragement and support to take those first steps into active, healthy lifestyles.”

Barry Horne, Chief Executive for EFDS said:

“It is a powerful proposition- to get so many more people out and active and we are proud to be leading on such a major investment. The programme has the potential to change how we encourage, enable and engage more people through active recreation opportunities.

“For many of those we are trying to attract, these opportunities have been out of reach or unappealing. Changing people’s mindsets is not an overnight solution and that’s why we’ve called upon so many partners to help make it happen. Today marks the start of an exciting journey for all involved.”

Statistics continually show disabled people to be the least active population and two thirds of disabled people stated they wanted to take part with non-disabled people in EFDS’s Lifestyle Report 2013. Inclusion will be at the heart of the programme through activity and volunteering.

Working together, the partners aim to increase the number of people who are able to access and enjoy local opportunities. This could be through local authority or independent provision, sports clubs or perhaps volunteering. Providers want to motivate people by tapping into their values and the things that matter most to them. This includes building friendships, maintaining health, having fun and progressing in life.

Importantly, a large proportion of the investment is for monitoring and evaluation, assessing the impact and allowing for more organisations to learn from the outcomes.

For more information on Get Out Get Active, visit www.efds.co.uk/GOGA  

 

British Gymnastics announce Disability Ambassadors

Following the success of the 2016 Paralympic Games and the incredible achievements of Paralympic athletes across all sports, British Gymnastics have enlisted four Disability Gymnastics Ambassadors to act as inspiring role models within Disability Gymnastics. Included in this group of Ambassadors is Skye Swinton who is a young recreational gymnast with Cerebral Palsy.

British Gymnastics is world renowned and recognised by the International Gymnastics Federation for its disability gymnastics programme that ensures gymnastics is adapted to suit the needs of each gymnast.

Since the launch of the I’M IN programme over three years ago, an increasing number of gymnastics clubs have committed to developing inclusive opportunities.

To support programmes and to inspire more disabled people to get involved in the sport, British Gymnastics are showcasing the opportunities that exist for everyone in gymnastics, from recreational, grassroots gymnastics up to elite levels.

The Disability Gymnastics Ambassadors are sharing their story and encouraging others to give it a try. The Ambassadors speak about their experience in gymnastics, what they have achieved and what they love about it. They tell other disabled people how inclusive they have found gymnastics to be, in clubs up and down the country. The Ambassadors show that disability is not a barrier, and they act as inspiring role models within Disability Gymnastics.

SKYE SWINTON

Disability: Cerebral Palsy (Spastic Diplegia)
Club: Rowan Gymnastics Club

At the age of 3, Skye’s mum took her to her to Rowan Gymnastics Club to try Pre-school Gymnastics and to try out some of their fantastic equipment. It was the first sport that Skye had tried, with her doctor recommending exercise as part of her physiotherapy. Four years later she has moved into the junior class and now takes part in recreational gymnastics classes week in, week out.

“Gymnastics is so much fun. I have lots of friends within my club and it helps me to get stronger. When I find things hard, my coaches help me. They make sure I’m included in all of the class activities; adapting exercises slightly if I’m finding them hard.”

Within Rowan Gymnastics Club’s recreational classes, there are a number of opportunities for all gymnasts to progress, compete and perform.

“My club runs a recreational gymnastics competition each year which I’ve taken part in and I’ve also enjoyed entering our local festival for disabled gymnasts and trampolinists. I’ve won a total of 4 gold medals and a bronze and am also proud to have earned my first 2 British Gymnastics’ Core Proficiency Awards (numbers 8 and 7).”

Skye continues to excel within gymnastics and proves that disability is not a barrier to taking part, but her success won’t stop there! She’s ambitious and determined to continue to improve. Skye’s goals are to be able to balance on a beam without anyone holding her and one day would like to be able to do the splits.

Confident that there are opportunities for everyone of every ability to succeed within gymnastics, Skye’s advice to other disabled people is that “it might be a bit tricky at first, but you will get better. Don’t let a disability hold you back, just try your best as it is great fun!”

The other Disability Ambassadors include:

ALEX BUESNEL
Disability: Autism
Club: Jersey Special Gymnastics Club

TIRI HUGHES

Disability: Physical Disability and Visual Impairment
Club: Hereford Sparks Gymnastics Club

NATASHA COATES

Disability: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome
Club: The Wire Gymnastics Club

 

 

For further information please visit Discover Gymnastics

Cerebral Palsy Sport launch new Frame Football resource

 

 

Front CoverCerebral Palsy Sport officially launch their Frame Football resource ‘A new way to play the beautiful game’ today.

The launch is at the training base for the England football team and the GB Paralympic football team, St Georges Park in Burton on Trent.

Today marks the official release of the resource, created by Cerebral Palsy Sport and the Football Association, to support clubs and coaches to understand Frame Football and the basics of getting started.

The resource, which is available from Cerebral Palsy Sport,  includes an understanding the different types of cerebral palsy, the equipment, guidelines for coaches and example activities. It has been supported by Sport England, the Association of Paediatric Chartered Physiotherapists (APCP), DM Orthotics and Quest 88.

Cerebral Palsy Sport have developed and trialled Frame Football with lots of feedback from coaches, equipment specialists, physiotherapists, parents and the players themselves to create a truly player centred football opportunity. Supported by the Football Association’s Disability Committee as a grassroots development programme, Frame Football is already gaining recognition as an inclusive Adapted Sport.

It is ideal for those using walking/gait training equipment such as a Frame or Walker. To find your local club please click here

The resource ‘Frame Football  – A new way to play the Beautiful Game’ costs £6 (including VAT) plus postage and packaging.

Order through our shop here

 

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CP Sport join together in British Rowing partnership

Cerebral Palsy Sport work with a range on National Governing Bodies of sport to ensure that there is a wide range of opportunities for people with cerebral palsy and physical disabilities.

British Rowing are just one of these providing indoor and water rowing this August in Leeds.

To see what other sports and activities Cerebral Palsy Sport offers; visit http://www.cpsport.org/sports/

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UK Sport and EIS launch talent ID campaign #DiscoverYourGold

UK Sport and the English Institute of Sport (EIS) have launched a new campaign #DiscoverYour Gold. It is the biggest multi-sport talent identification campaign in British history, #DiscoverYour Gold, aims to identify talented young athletes who have the potential to become future champions.

Over 20 sports are involved in #DiscoverYour Gold, a partnership between UK Sport, the English Institute of Sport (EIS), and a range of National Governing Bodies, targeting 15-24 year olds to be fast-tracked into the exciting world of high performance sport.

There are numerous para sports recruiting for new athletes including Para-Athletics, Para-Swimming, Para-Cycling, Disability shooting, Para-Rowing, Para-Canoe, Powerlifting, Para-Archery, Visually Impaired Judo, Para-Triathlon, Disability Table Tennis, Wheelchair Basketball, Wheelchair Rugby, Wheelchair Tennis, Boccia and Para-Taekwondo. #DiscoverYourParaPotential

If you believe you have got what it takes and want to find out more, visit the UK Sport website

CP Sport offers a wide variety of opportunities and pathways for all levels including potential future champions. For a full list of our events and sports opportunities please visit our events page here

 

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Together We Will – take a look at the healthier lifestyle tips

Together We Will… get healthier

We all know that being active and taking regular exercise is good for our health, both physically and mentally. While many of us want to be more active, sometimes we don’t know where to start or who to speak to. Together We Will has released five top tips to support and empower disabled people to be more active and get healthier.

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This summer, Together We Will is encouraging disabled people to become healthier, stronger and have fun being active with friends and family.

As part of the campaign, the National Disability Sports Organisations (NDSOs) and English Federation of Disability Sport (EFDS) have published five tip tops to support disabled people on their way to be more active and become healthier.

Together We Will…get healthier five top tips are:

  1. Talk to a healthcare professional to work out which activities best suit you.
  2. Choose an activity you enjoy and invite a friend or family member to join in – so you can motivate each other.
  3. Start slowly and build up. Don’t do more today than you can do tomorrow.
  4. Try to include exercise in your daily routine. It can boost memory, reduce stress and improve sleep.
  5. Set yourself a goal. No matter how small, achieving it will have positive impact on your body and mind.

The Together We Will campaign is brought to you by the NDSOs and EFDS, with backing from Sport England. It looks to address the low number of disabled people who regularly take part in sport or exercise as highlighted in the most recent Sport England Active People Survey.

Results show that disabled people are half as likely to be active as non-disabled people. As one in five people in England have an impairment or long-term health condition, disabled people make up a large proportion of everyone’s community. However, research highlights often disabled people do not find the opportunities accessible or appealing enough, or do not know where to go to find the right information.

Other insight shows that disabled people are keen to involve family and friends when being active and do not necessarily take part with just other disabled people. Fun is also highlighted as a key motivator for disabled people to be active.