Landmark report reveals children’s activity levels for the first time

Findings from Sport England’s new research; ‘Active Lives Children and Young People’ highlights that there are 2.3 million children and young people who are doing less than 30 minutes of activity a day. ‘Active Lives Children and Young People’ is the largest ever survey of its kind, and provides comprehensive insight into how children in England are taking part in sport and physical activity both in and out of school.

The research report identifies the collation between being active and positive health and mental wellbeing as well as personal development.  The reports clearly states that more needs to be done to increase activity levels of children and young people, something that Cerebral Palsy Sport fully supports and will help to address.

Finding include:

  • Around 3 million children (43.3%) lead active lives, doing an average of 60 or more minutes of physical activity a day.
  • Among active children, only the most active 1.2m (17.5% of total) are meeting the CMO guideline of 60+ minutes of activity a day, every day of the week.
  • Just over 2.3 million children and young people (32.9%) are less active which means they do less than 30 minutes of physical activity a day.
  • A further 1.7m (23.9%) are fairly active, doing 30-59 minutes of physical activity a day.
  • Sport England CEO Tim Hollingsworth calls for a focus on the health and wellbeing of young people with system-wide change.

Cerebral Palsy Sport’s vision is to support people with cerebral palsy and associated physical impairments, to reach their potential through active recreation. Our 2019 Sport Development programme consists of 40 events and activities that will provide opportunities for children and young people to access sport, often for the first time, and continue to participate on a regular basis.

To find out more about what events we have planned please click here

To download and read the Sport England report please visit www.sportengland.org/activeliveschildren

#activeliveschildren

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First evidence review of physical activity among disabled adults

New nationally developed resources to support disabled adults to get more physically active were launched at the International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress (ISPAH) in London. These include a first evidence review published by Public Health England and a new UK Chief Medical Officer (CMO) infographic to make physical activity recommendations more accessible and support disabled people.

  • Four in five disabled people report they would like to do more physical activity[i]
  • Yet, disabled adults are twice as likely to be inactive than non-disabled adults, with potentially around 3.5 million disabled adults at greater risk of poor health due to inactivity [ii]
  • New resources support disabled adults to get active to improve their health and make physical activity recommendations more accessible

There are 11.5 million disabled people in England and nearly half (42%) are inactive[1]per week compared to 21% of non-disabled people; a two-fold difference. However, four in five disabled people report they would like to do more physical activity, highlighting continued barriers that prevent them from being active.

Concern around safety is often cited as a major barrier to disabled people undertaking physical activity, but the review has shown that when performed at an appropriate level and intensity, this should not hinder them being more active and will lead to health benefits.

The UK is at the forefront of action to address these inequalities with new nationally developed resources to help disabled adults get more physically active being launched at the International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress (ISPAH) in London today.

These include:

  • a world first evidence review published by Public Health England (PHE) that highlights a critical need for disabled adults to do more physical activity to improve their health; and
  • a new UK Chief Medical Officer (CMO) infographic to make physical activity recommendations more accessible and support disabled people in getting more active.

These works consider the breadth of impairments, covering long term physical, sensory, cognitive, and/or mental health impairments, something never done before in the UK.

They have been developed to address psychological barriers which play the biggest role in preventing disabled people from taking part in physical activity, including the attitudes and perceptions of disabled people and non-disabled people that activity might be unsafe or worsen their impairment.

While national physical activity guidelines are currently produced for the whole population, the new evidence shows there is no risk for disabled people undertaking physical activity.

It is recommended that disabled people build up physical activity, concentrating first on frequency, then duration, before finally raising the intensity level. This is especially significant for those that are not active at all and those with other existing health conditions.

The review shows that being more active will improve their health, including improved fitness, muscle strength, undertaking of everyday tasks (e.g. housework and gardening), wellbeing, and sense of community, as well as reduced risk of diseases such as cardiovascular disease.

Launching PHE’s evidence review at the ISPAH Congress, Duncan Selbie, PHE chief executive, said:

“Moving more is important for everyone and we must better support people who face barriers to being active. We can all find something that suits our needs and abilities from walking, to playing ball games, or joining a gym.”

Alongside the evidence review, the existing UK CMOs’ physical activity guidelines have been made more inclusive of disabled people. An infographic for healthcare professionals and disabled people has been produced that better highlights the benefits and practical steps to getting active to improve health.

The infographic has been developed in collaboration with 350 disabled people, 10 disability organisations and 50 healthcare professionals and is endorsed by the four UK CMOs.

Chief Medical Officer for England, Professor Dame Sally Davies, said: 

“Being active is good for our health – both physical and mental. It is important that disabled people in the UK do not miss out on the benefits that being active can bring. I hope that the new infographic, designed by disabled people for disabled people, will help more people reap the benefits of physical activity in a safe and healthy way.”

ISPAH is co-hosted by PHE and Sport England and co-sponsored by the European network for the promotion of health enhancing physical activity (HEPA Europe) and the World Health Organisation (WHO). It aims to bring the best international minds together to bridge the gap between physical activity research, policy and practice to tackle health inequalities and support healthier nations across the world.

 Visit PHE’s website on www.gov.uk/phe.

The PHE evidence review will be available on PHE’s website

  1. The findings have already been adopted as part of the UK Chief Medical Officer’s (CMO) national physical activity guidelines. The 2019 guidelines will support disabled adults to be more physically active to improve their health.
  2. The majority of disabled people (83%) acquire impairment during their lives, which is why these resources focus on adults.
  3. The majority of impairments are not visible, for example Sport England’s Mapping Disability: The Facts reports that fewer than 1 in 10 (5–7%) of disabled people are in a wheelchair.
  4. Physical inactivity is in the top ten greatest causes of ill health nationally, with negative impacts on physical wellbeing, mental wellbeing, individual development, social and community development, and economic development for individuals and communities.

[1] Inactivity refers to people doing less than 30 minutes of moderate intensity activity per week.

[i] The Activity Trap, Activity Alliance, published 8 October 2018, http://www.activityalliance.org.uk/how-we-help/research/the-activity-trap

[ii] Active Lives Adult Survey May 17/18 report, Sport England, published 11 October 2018, https://www.sportengland.org/media/13558/active-lives-adult-may-2017-18-report.pdf

 

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Government Consultation: Review of GCSE, AS and A level physical education activity list

Government consultation: Review of GCSE, AS and A level physical education activity list

The government is seeking views on the review of the PE activity list in schools.

In 2015 the Government committed to reviewing the GCSE, AS and A Level PE activity list in autumn 2018, following the first award of the reformed qualifications in summer 2018.

Accordingly, the Department for Education is now inviting proposals to add activities to the published list.

Responses to the review should be submitted here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/review-of-gcse-as-and-a-level-physical-education-activity-list.

This review is open to the public and the Department will consider all responses.

The deadline for submissions is 20 December 2018.

 

Cerebral Palsy Sport Launch #CPCan Campaign

To coincide with Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month, CP Sport will be using the whole of March to promote #CPCan.
The #CPCan Campaign is about raising awareness of cerebral palsy, promoting the range of fantastic opportunities that are available for people with cerebral palsy and physical disabilities, and showcase what people with CP can do.

As a charity who has people with cerebral palsy at the heart of everything do, we want to use CP Awareness Month and #CPCan to inspire people with CP and their families to get involved with Sport and active recreation, and we want to engage with our members, users and followers.

To show your support download you #CPCan poster here #CPCan Poster Green, take your picture and send us your story of support to info@cpsport.org

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#CPCan

Support CP Sport by donating or for more information on fundraising visit www.cpsport.org/support-us/or email info@cpsport.org

Government launches new Obesity Plan

The Government has today launched its plan to tackle childhood obesity including details on a Soft Drinks Industry Levy.

Childhood Obesity: A Plan for Action outlines the Government’s goals and actions to cut childhood obesity within the next ten years, a figure that currently stands at a third of children between the ages of 2 and 15.Included in the action plan is more information on the ‘sugar tax’ which the Government announced in the Budget earlier this year. The plan also confirms the commitment the Government made at the Budget to invest the revenue from the soft drinks industry levy, which is targeted at the producers and importers of soft drinks, in ‘programmes to reduce obesity and encourage physical activity and balanced diets for school children’. This will see the doubling of the Primary PE and Sport Premium as well as put a further £10 million a year in to healthy breakfast clubs for schools. The Government has also launched a consultation on the detail of the levy.

The Government has also included in the plan details on how they intendsto increase the duration and quality of physical activity and sport in schools. It recommends that school children should be receiving 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity every day, in-line with the recommendations of the UK Chief Medical Officers. At least 30 minutes of this should be delivered in school with the remaining 30 minutes supported by parents and carers outside of school time.

To help facilitate this, Government has asked County Sports Partnerships to work with National Governing Bodies and Youth Sport Trust, as well as other national and local providers, to offer high-quality sport programmes to every primary school from September 2017.

The plan also includes:

  • A new healthy rating scheme for primary schools to encourage schools to develop and improve their contributions to the improvement of children’s healthy through their diet and physical activity. This rating scheme will be taken in to account during Ofsted inspections and parent will also be involved in the rating process
  • In addition to inspections, in 2017 Ofsted will undertake a thematic review of obesity, healthy eating and physical activity in schools
  • In early 2017, Government will update the Early Years Foundation Stage Framework to make specific reference to the UK Chief Medical Officers’ guidelines for physical activity
  • Public Health England will produce advice to schools for the academic year 2017/18 on how schools can work with the school nurses, health centres, healthy weight teams and other resources to help children develop a healthier lifestyle
  • Commitment to continued Government investment in walking and cycling to school and the production of a Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy
  • Moves to enable health professionals to support families including strengthening guidance on physical activity for midwives and health visitors

To download a full copy of the report:

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