The Active Lives Survey shows more disabled people becoming active

Sport England has published the latest official statistics from the Active Lives Survey, the most comprehensive snapshot of the nation’s sport and physical activity habits, based on a sample of almost 180,000 respondents. The report also shows a positive increase for disabled people.

  • Survey shows highest number of active people ever recorded and lowest ever level of people doing less than 30 minutes of activity a week.
  • Improvements driven by women and older adults.
  • Active people report higher levels of mental wellbeing and are more likely to be satisfied with their life, feel happier and less anxious.
  • Those benefits are still less likely to be accessed by less affluent people, where lower activity and higher inactivity rates remain.

The results show the highest level of activity ever recorded – 1,015,700 million more people are active now, compared to when the survey started in 2015. Active means meeting the Chief Medical Officer’s recommended amount of 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity a week.

The report also makes clear the mental health benefits of being active. When asked to rate their mental health on a scale of 0-10, active people reported feeling:

  • More satisfied with their lives.
  • Happier.
  • More likely to feel the things they do in life are worthwhile.
  • Less anxious.

Spanning the period May 2018 – May 2019, the survey also shows that the number of adults doing less than 30 minutes of physical activity a week has decreased by 131,700 since 2015.

The decreasing inactivity levels are driven by women and adults aged 55 and over. These are groups that Sport England has focussed on in its strategy Towards an Active Nation with campaigns such as This Girl Can, a £10 million fund for projects that support people 55 and over to get active.

Tim Hollingsworth, Chief Executive at Sport England said:

“It’s really excellent news that a record number of people are now active every week and that we’re also seeing a significant decrease in the amount of inactive people.

“It shows us that efforts to help more people get active are starting to make a real difference, particularly for older adults, women and those with a disability or long-term health condition.

“But we can’t be complacent. Within the overall positive picture of these figures is a sobering reality – if you are well-off you are far more likely to be active than if you’re on a low income or less affluent.

“While there are complex barriers that stop less well-off people from getting active, this is an unacceptable inequality and one we’re starting to address in the work we are doing across the country – including piloting programmes in 12 local areas to tackle inequality.

“Being active has positive benefits for mental and physical wellbeing, strengthens communities and helps build confidence and resilience. We urge anyone working towards helping people live healthier lives – whether that’s government policy makers or health professionals – to consider physical activity as a vehicle to help drive positive outcomes, so that everyone can benefit.”

The Active Lives Survey showed for disabled people and people with long-term health conditions:
An increase in activity levels (216,300 more) and a decrease in inactivity levels (107,800 fewer) amongst disabled people or people with long-term health conditions, showing efforts to support these groups are working.

However, they are still twice as likely to be inactive than non-disabled people, so work continues to support and inspire people into physical activity. This includes the new campaign We Are Undefeatable, which Cerebral Palsy Sport has promoted and led by 15 of the leading health and social care charities and backed with National Lottery funding and expertise by Sport England.

Cerebral Palsy Sport’s Start and Stay Active project is funded by Sport England to enable more people with cerebral palsy and other physical disabilities to become more active. Learn more about the project here

CP Sport makes Digital Pledge as Sport England calls on the sport sector to embrace digital media

Sport England are calling on the sport and physical activity sector to embrace technology to make it easier for people to get active.

A ComRes survey commissioned by Sport England found that people find it twice as easy to order takeaway food online than to book a sport or fitness class.

Sport England are awarding £1.5 million of National Lottery funding to the Open Data Institute (ODI) to help the sector innovate, open their data and develop their digital offering.

Chief Executive of Sport England, Tim Hollingsworth is urging sport and physical activity providers to commit to opening their data;

“Our survey shows that at the moment there are too many barriers to entry. So, this is about giving the public the choice to find sport and physical activity in a way that meets the expectations they have in all other aspects of their lives.

With consumers increasingly using online services as a regular part of their life, opening data will give consumers greater access to sport online in a way that best fits their lives.

Cerebral Palsy Sport has made a pledge to Sport England and the
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS)
to open it’s event data, to support consumer-focused digital innovation with a particular focus on under-represented groups and to improve the standard of digital skills and literacy within the organisation. These are seen as important steps towards helping more people get active.

Cerebral Palsy Sport already recognise the importance of reach and quality of information available digitally. In 2018:

  • We created 2.36 million impressions on Twitter
  • We achieved 1.86 million reach on Facebook
  • We reached 7,605 affiliate members
  • We recorded 157,211 website page views
  • We published 30 e-newsletters
  • We achieved 100% satisfaction rating with our members.

Survey Results show more disabled people are active.

Sport England latest Active Lives Adults survey results demonstrate that more women, older adults, disabled people and those with long-term health conditions are getting active.

The results based on data gathered from November 2017-November 2018 show more people are doing at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity (recommended by the Chief Medical officers guidelines) a week compared to 12 months ago.

In addition to the increase in people classed as active, the number of inactive adults – those doing fewer than 30 minutes of physical activity a week has reduced.

This mean that 62.6% of the adult population are now classed as active, with 25.1% now inactive.

The research also shows that enjoyment is the biggest motivator for the active while, for those who are not active, perceived ability has the biggest impact on how much they do.

Figures also show an increase of 133,200 in the number of disabled people and those with long-term health conditions classed as active – the first increase in this category since the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games – with gym sessions showing the biggest growth.

Cerebral Palsy Sports 2017-2020 project ‘Start and Stay Active’ has contributed to the increase in disabled people becoming more active. The ‘Start’ element of the project ensures that there are appropriate opportunities for people with CP and associated physical impairments to access sport and activity. The ‘Stay’ element is there to support people to continue to participate in sport and activity, developing a resilient habit for life.
To find out more about Cerebral Palsy Sports Start and Stay Active project click here
To read the Active Lives Adults report click here

Sport England release first Active Lives Children and Young People Survey results

World-leading new research published by Sport England, carried out independently by Ipsos MORI, provides the richest evidence yet on which factors positively influence the chance of a child being active. The release comes at a crucial time, given the imminent release of the Government’s School Sport Action plan, its green paper on preventing long-term health conditions, and the plans to use physical activity to integrate communities and reduce childhood obesity

RaceRunning   Swimming

Currently around 3 million children and young people (43.3%) are active, but a third of children (32.9%) are less active, doing less than 30 minutes of activity a day.

To understand this, Sport England’s Active Lives Children and Young People Attitudes Survey – which is the largest survey of its kind – asked children about their attitudes towards sport and physical activity. The results prove for the first time that children’s physical literacy impacts not only the amount of activity they do, but also how much they benefit from this activity.

Physical literacy means that children have a positive attitude towards five elements of taking part in sport and physical activity: enjoyment, confidence, competence (how easy they find it), understanding (that it is beneficial) and knowledge (knowing how to get involved and improve).

The key findings are:

  1. Physically literate children do twice as much activity. The more of the five elements of physical literacy children have, the more active they are.
  2. Enjoyment is the biggest driver of activity levels. Despite the majority of children (68%) understanding that sport and activity is good for them, understanding has the least impact on activity levels.
  3. Children who have all five elements of physically literacy report higher levels of happiness, are more trusting of other children, and report higher levels of resilience (continuing to try if you find something difficult).
  4. Physical literacy decreases with age. As children grow older, they report lower levels of enjoyment, confidence, competence, and understanding. Previous research from Sport England shows that activity levels drop when children reach their teenage years.
  5. The results also reveal important inequalities among certain groups of children which must be tackled:
  • Girls are less likely to say they enjoy or feel confident about doing sport and physical activity (58% of boys enjoy it, compared to 43% of girls. 47% of boys feel confident, compared to 31% of girls). In children aged 5-7, boys are more likely to love playing sport, while girls are more likely to love being active.
  • Children from the least affluent families are less likely to enjoy activity than those from the most affluent families, and previous research shows they are also far less likely to be active.
  • Black children are more physically literate than other ethnic groups – particularly boys, but are less active than the population as a whole.

Commenting, Tim Hollingsworth, Chief Executive at Sport England said:

“This is a critical moment for all of society to better understand what will motivate young people to get active.  This survey gives us the richest evidence yet that sport and physical activity for children needs to be fun and enjoyable above all.

“The fact that a third of children aren’t nearly as active as they need to be demonstrates that we need to do things differently if we want to build a generation of young people who want to take part in physical activity as children and into adulthood.

“With previous research showing that active children have better levels of attendance and achievement, we must prioritise physical literacy with the same vigour that we address numeracy and literacy. Doing so could not only help teaching and learning outcomes, it could be hugely beneficial for the physical and mental health of our children.

“We hope these results will be considered and acted on by all who deliver activity and sport. At Sport England, we look forward to playing our part to get children active as we roll out our national programme to train over 17,000 secondary school teachers in how to offer a greater breadth of PE and school sport that meets the needs of all pupils.”

Mims Davies, Minister for Sport and Civil Society, said:

“The message is clear – fun and enjoyment is what gets and keeps children active. We know an active child is a happier child but too many are losing the confidence and enjoyment of sporting activities as they get older.

“Our upcoming cross Government School Sport Action Plan will help to ensure all children have access to quality PE, sporting sessions and clubs – in school, after school, during weekends and holidays.

“I want to work with the sector as they play their part in making sport and physical activity both enjoyable and engaging for young people of all abilities and backgrounds.”

Children and Families Minister Nadhim Zahawi said:

“We are committed to helping young people live happy and healthy lives by staying active. That’s why this Government introduced the first-ever strategy to tackle childhood obesity as well as boosting the PE and Sport Premium to invest £320 million every year to help primary schools deliver sport.

“We are also encouraging more young people to get involved in physical activity – last year we announced plans to help more children swim confidently and are working with leading sporting bodies, including the Premier League and England Hockey, to increase participation in competitive sports in our schools.

“That all comes ahead of our School Sport Action Plan, which we will publish shortly, to help get more young people active and enjoying the benefits of sport.”

The full report can be downloaded via the Sport England website.

Cerebral Palsy Sport lead the way in sports governance

Cerebral Palsy Sport, one of seven National Disability Sports Organisations (NDSOs) is the first NDSO to achieve compliance with the Code for Sports Governance.

Cerebral Palsy Sport is the country’s leading national disability sports charity supporting people with cerebral palsy and associated physical impairments to reach their sporting potential and putting people with cerebral palsy and their families at the heart of everything we do.

The Code for Sports Governance was published following the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2016. The code has been created by Sport England and UK Sport in order to maximise the effectiveness of investment received by sports providers and organisations.

In 2017 Cerebral Palsy Sport was successful in securing a three year funding grant from Sport England. The grant will ensure that the charity can continue to deliver a range of projects and programmes for children, young people and their families allowing them to ‘Start’ their sporting journey and continue to ‘Stay Active’.  A key component of the funding agreement was to achieve and maintain compliance with the Governance Code at the required level. Throughout 2018 Cerebral Palsy Sport worked hard to ensure that the principles of the code underpinned the structure of the charity with final changes agreed by members at the AGM in October 2018.

Cerebral Palsy Sport has been recognised and praised by Sport England for achieving compliance with the Governance Code and demonstrating their commitment to sustaining good governance that is fit for purpose and will support the charity’s growth.

Ali Talbot, Chief Executive at Cerebral Palsy Sport said:

“The whole team and Trustee of the charity have worked hard to build and resilient governance programme within the charity and we are delighted to have reached this milestone. We seek to continue to develop our governance programme and not rest on our laurels so we can work to create even more opportunities for people with cerebral palsy to play, participate and enjoy sport”.

 Commenting, Adam Blaze, Strategic Lead for Disability at Sport England said:

‘Sport England is determined to support organisations who receive public funds to meet the required standards of governance. As a direct result of the changes brought in through complying with the code, the aim is that individual organisations and wider partners will become more productive, sustainable and responsible.

We’re delighted that Cerebral Palsy Sport have achieved compliance with the Code, and that we have been able to support them on this journey. They are in a strong position to continue and build on the important work that they do, supporting people with cerebral palsy and their families to be active, and contributing to reducing the activity gap that exists between disabled and non-disabled people.’

 

For more information on the Code for Sports Governance visit here

 About Sport England

Sport England is a public body and invests up to £300 million National Lottery and government money each year in projects and programmes that help people get active and play sport.

It wants everyone in England, regardless of age, background, or level of ability, to feel able to engage in sport and physical activity. That’s why a lot of its work is specifically focused on helping people who do no, or very little, physical activity and groups who are typically less active – like women, disabled people and people on lower incomes.

 

 

New physical activity resource for health professionals

Launched at the International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress (ISPAH) , the new digital Moving Medicine tool will help healthcare professionals advise patients on how physical activity can help to manage their conditions, prevent disease and aid recovery.

It is produced by the Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine (FSEM) in partnership with Public Health England (PHE) and Sport England with support from National Lottery funding.

Currently one in four of the population in England does less than 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity a week and are classified as inactive.

Physical inactivity is in the top 10 greatest causes of ill health nationally, with negative impacts on health, wellbeing, social and economic outcomes for individuals and communities.

Evidence shows that one in four patients would be more active if advised by a GP or nurse, yet nearly three quarters of GPs do not speak about the benefits of physical activity to patients due to either lack of knowledge, skills or confidence.

The tool focuses on helping to address the most common long term health conditions affecting the population, such as cancer, depression, musculoskeletal pain and type 2 diabetes.

Developed in consultation with over 300 healthcare professionals and patients and using evidence-based step-by-step guidance, Moving Medicine is designed to provide healthcare professionals with the latest evidence to address this knowledge and skills gap in the NHS and support healthier outcomes for patients as a result.

Rt Hon Matt Hancock MP, Secretary of State for Health and Social care said:

There is a mountain of evidence to suggest that patients with all kinds of conditions – from depression to diabetes – would benefit from more exercise, yet understandably those suffering with chronic illness are more likely to be inactive.

That’s why it’s so important healthcare professionals have the information they need at their fingertips to advise patients with complex health needs on how to get more active – and this doesn’t have to mean joining a gym. It can be doing more of the things we love, whether that’s playing football, swimming or going for long walks. I am delighted to launch this brilliant web tool for healthcare professionals – I hope it will help pave the way for a culture shift in medicine where referrals for exercise are just as common as prescriptions for medication.

Dr Alison Tedstone, Head of Physical Activity at Public Health England, said:

With millions accessing the NHS every day, healthcare professionals play a vital role in helping people to better understand the benefits of physical activity on their health.

Taking the time to have these conversations has the power to inspire people to move more and make a big difference to their health.

Dr Paul D Jackson, President, Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine (UK) said:

The development of the Moving Medicine platform has been a truly collaborative effort, drawing on the expertise of many across a wide range of different disciplines and professional bodies as well as medical Royal Colleges, associated charities and patient groups.

We all believe that introducing more physical activity into every care pathway across the NHS is an essential, cost-effective intervention to improve people’s health. Moving Medicine will ensure that all health care professionals have up to date information on physical activity presented in a useable, easy to understand format, enabling them to inform their patients and motivate them to become more active.

Sarah Ruane, Strategic Lead for Health, Sport England said:

We know that it can be difficult to fit being active into busy lives. But for people who are dealing with illness or injury the thought of being active can be even more daunting. That’s why healthcare professionals have such a vital role to play.

Moving Medicine is a simple idea with huge potential to transform the lives of the millions of people who are inactive and living with health conditions. Equipping healthcare professionals with the practical information that they need to have supportive conversations with their patients, will help many more people to experience the range of health benefits that being active can bring.

Moving Medicine is a major component of the Moving Healthcare Professionals Programme, which is designed to support healthcare professionals embed physical activity into their approach to treating patients for common conditions in line with existing National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance.

The resource has been launched at the seventh ISPAH congress in London this week (15 to 17 October 2018), which aims to bring the best minds together to bridge the gap between physical activity research, policy and practice to support healthier nations across the world.

First evidence review of physical activity among disabled adults

New nationally developed resources to support disabled adults to get more physically active were launched at the International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress (ISPAH) in London. These include a first evidence review published by Public Health England and a new UK Chief Medical Officer (CMO) infographic to make physical activity recommendations more accessible and support disabled people.

  • Four in five disabled people report they would like to do more physical activity[i]
  • Yet, disabled adults are twice as likely to be inactive than non-disabled adults, with potentially around 3.5 million disabled adults at greater risk of poor health due to inactivity [ii]
  • New resources support disabled adults to get active to improve their health and make physical activity recommendations more accessible

There are 11.5 million disabled people in England and nearly half (42%) are inactive[1]per week compared to 21% of non-disabled people; a two-fold difference. However, four in five disabled people report they would like to do more physical activity, highlighting continued barriers that prevent them from being active.

Concern around safety is often cited as a major barrier to disabled people undertaking physical activity, but the review has shown that when performed at an appropriate level and intensity, this should not hinder them being more active and will lead to health benefits.

The UK is at the forefront of action to address these inequalities with new nationally developed resources to help disabled adults get more physically active being launched at the International Society for Physical Activity and Health Congress (ISPAH) in London today.

These include:

  • a world first evidence review published by Public Health England (PHE) that highlights a critical need for disabled adults to do more physical activity to improve their health; and
  • a new UK Chief Medical Officer (CMO) infographic to make physical activity recommendations more accessible and support disabled people in getting more active.

These works consider the breadth of impairments, covering long term physical, sensory, cognitive, and/or mental health impairments, something never done before in the UK.

They have been developed to address psychological barriers which play the biggest role in preventing disabled people from taking part in physical activity, including the attitudes and perceptions of disabled people and non-disabled people that activity might be unsafe or worsen their impairment.

While national physical activity guidelines are currently produced for the whole population, the new evidence shows there is no risk for disabled people undertaking physical activity.

It is recommended that disabled people build up physical activity, concentrating first on frequency, then duration, before finally raising the intensity level. This is especially significant for those that are not active at all and those with other existing health conditions.

The review shows that being more active will improve their health, including improved fitness, muscle strength, undertaking of everyday tasks (e.g. housework and gardening), wellbeing, and sense of community, as well as reduced risk of diseases such as cardiovascular disease.

Launching PHE’s evidence review at the ISPAH Congress, Duncan Selbie, PHE chief executive, said:

“Moving more is important for everyone and we must better support people who face barriers to being active. We can all find something that suits our needs and abilities from walking, to playing ball games, or joining a gym.”

Alongside the evidence review, the existing UK CMOs’ physical activity guidelines have been made more inclusive of disabled people. An infographic for healthcare professionals and disabled people has been produced that better highlights the benefits and practical steps to getting active to improve health.

The infographic has been developed in collaboration with 350 disabled people, 10 disability organisations and 50 healthcare professionals and is endorsed by the four UK CMOs.

Chief Medical Officer for England, Professor Dame Sally Davies, said: 

“Being active is good for our health – both physical and mental. It is important that disabled people in the UK do not miss out on the benefits that being active can bring. I hope that the new infographic, designed by disabled people for disabled people, will help more people reap the benefits of physical activity in a safe and healthy way.”

ISPAH is co-hosted by PHE and Sport England and co-sponsored by the European network for the promotion of health enhancing physical activity (HEPA Europe) and the World Health Organisation (WHO). It aims to bring the best international minds together to bridge the gap between physical activity research, policy and practice to tackle health inequalities and support healthier nations across the world.

 Visit PHE’s website on www.gov.uk/phe.

The PHE evidence review will be available on PHE’s website

  1. The findings have already been adopted as part of the UK Chief Medical Officer’s (CMO) national physical activity guidelines. The 2019 guidelines will support disabled adults to be more physically active to improve their health.
  2. The majority of disabled people (83%) acquire impairment during their lives, which is why these resources focus on adults.
  3. The majority of impairments are not visible, for example Sport England’s Mapping Disability: The Facts reports that fewer than 1 in 10 (5–7%) of disabled people are in a wheelchair.
  4. Physical inactivity is in the top ten greatest causes of ill health nationally, with negative impacts on physical wellbeing, mental wellbeing, individual development, social and community development, and economic development for individuals and communities.

[1] Inactivity refers to people doing less than 30 minutes of moderate intensity activity per week.

[i] The Activity Trap, Activity Alliance, published 8 October 2018, http://www.activityalliance.org.uk/how-we-help/research/the-activity-trap

[ii] Active Lives Adult Survey May 17/18 report, Sport England, published 11 October 2018, https://www.sportengland.org/media/13558/active-lives-adult-may-2017-18-report.pdf

 

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Tim Hollingsworth appointed new Chief Executive at Sport England

Sport England have announced that Tim Hollingsworth has been appointed as Sport England’s new Chief Executive.

Tim is currently Chief Executive of the British Paralympic Association, a role he has held since 2011. He replaces Jennie Price, who announced in May that she would be leaving Sport England after 11 years as CEO.

Tim will bring a wealth of senior experience to Sport England.  As Chief Executive of the British Paralympic Association, he led the organisation through both the historic London 2012 and Rio 2016 Paralympic Games, with ParalympicsGB achieving an incredible 147 medals at the latter to finish second in the medal table.

More recently ParalympicsGB achieved its best-ever performance at a Winter Games, winning seven medals including a gold at Pyeongchang 2018.   Alongside this success at Games time Tim has led the increase in profile and interest in the Paralympic movement, driven the commercial and business growth of the BPA as a charity and ensured it is at the forefront of challenging perceptions of disability in society.

Prior to the BPA he was at UK Sport for seven years, first as Director of Policy & Communications and then Chief Operating Officer, following over a decade working in senior roles in corporate communications.  Tim is also currently a Board Director of the Youth Sport Trust and the National Paralympic Heritage Trust and a member of the International Paralympic Committee’s Paralympic Games Committee.

Commenting on the appointment, Nick Bitel, Chairman of Sport England said: “We are thrilled that Tim will be joining us as our new Chief Executive. We were fortunate to have had a number of outstanding candidates for the role. Tim’s passion for sport, wealth of relevant experience and boundless enthusiasm for Sport England’s strategy really shone through and we look forward to welcoming him in the autumn. I would also like to warmly thank Jennie for her tireless service and dedication to Sport England over the past 11 years. She leaves an organisation full of confidence for the future and on course to deliver against its ambitious vision to create a healthier and happier nation through sport and physical activity.”

Tim Hollingsworth said: “I am absolutely delighted to be appointed as the next Chief Executive of Sport England. The organisation is one I know well and its vision and strategy have never been more important as we seek as a nation to maximise the ways in which people from all areas of society are attracted to, access and benefit from sport and physical activity.

“I would also like to express my gratitude to everyone involved in the Paralympic movement for the past seven incredible years and am pleased the BPA will remain a key partner in my new role.  It is one that I relish and I can’t wait to get started.”

Commenting on Tim’s departure, British Paralympic Association Chairman Nick Webborn said: “Tim Hollingsworth has been a key figure in the huge growth of Paralympic sport in the UK, and the British Paralympic Association is now widely recognised as a world leading National Paralympic Committee.

“He harnessed the once in a generation opportunity presented by London 2012 which helped transform perceptions of disabled people in this country.  Under Tim’s stewardship the BPA has also been determined to broaden the impact of those performances to deliver on its vision: through sport, inspire a better world for disabled people.

“While I am sad to see Tim leave the BPA I am delighted he is staying in the sporting sector and look forward to continue to work closely with him in his new role at Sport England.”

Sports Minister Tracey Crouch said: “Tim is a fantastic appointment by Sport England and I am sure he will do a great job in leading the organisation and continuing the implementation of the government’s world leading sport strategy – encouraging more people to get involved in sport and physical activity for the positive impact it can have on their lives. Tim has great experience in sports administration and will seamlessly take the baton from Jennie Price, who I thank for her hard work over the past decade.”

Ali Talbot, Chief Executive of Cerebral Palsy Sport said: “We are delighted to hear the news of Tim’s appointment to the role of Chief Executive at Sport England. We are pleased to see such a committed individual with an in-depth knowledge of disability and Paralympic sport joining Sport England and we look forward to working with Tim in the future”.

Tim Hollingsworth will join Sport England in November.

Tim_Hollingsworth

Cerebral Palsy Sport launch new RaceRunning film

Cerebral Palsy Sport is delighted to launch our new film about the adapted sport of RaceRunning during Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month and part of our #CPCan 2018 campaign. This film has been developed through a unique partnership between Cerebral Palsy Sport and Nottingham Trent University with TAD Productions.

We are proud to share our film with you. Please click below:

RaceRunning is an adapted sport being developed by Cerebral Palsy Sport in England. It is for children, young people and adults who cannot functionally run and rely on sports aids for mobility and balance. Speaking on the launch of the film, Ali Talbot Chief Executive of Cerebral Palsy Sport said:

“We are very proud to be able to introduce our RaceRunning film as part of Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month and are very grateful to the Media students of TAD Productions from Nottingham Trent University that worked so hard to bring this film to fruition. It has been a unique partnership and one we seek to grow for the future with the University.”

Ali also added: “We are also very grateful to the stars of the film – our RaceRunners. Some of them have been taking part for a numbers of years and some have only recently taken up the sport. They show how beautiful this sport can be and the difference it can make to the lives of people with cerebral palsy”.

Taster RR Session   IMG_7813


 

RaceRunning is a three wheeled frame where the athlete is supported by a saddle and body plate. The athlete propels against the frame using their feet, and steers using the mobility within their hands and/or arms. People with cerebral palsy can take part as a recreational activity and RaceRunning is a very effective way of improving overall fitness, strength and physical and emotional well-being.

There is also competitions available with athletics events in distances from 60m, 100m, 200m, 400m, 800m and 1500m depending on the athlete’s experience and level of fitness.

racerunning   2016-07-13 11.16.50


 

Cerebral Palsy Sport run a series of RaceRunning Start days to introduce people with cerebral palsy into this wonderful adapted sport and to enable them to try the activity for the first time. For more information on our RaceRunning Start days, please visit:

Cerebral Palsy Sport wishes to grow the awareness and participation of this unique adapted sport  of RaceRunning and we are indebted to everyone who has supported this film.

Our sincere thanks goes to Nottingham Trent University and TAD Productions for supporting this unique project; to the University of Nottingham for hosting us and to Quest 88 for all their support through filming

Our biggest thanks goes to the all the RaceRunners and their families who gave up their time to help to make this film. We could do have done this without you!

CP Sport logo   Quest-88-LogoNTU

Cerebral Palsy Sport Table Cricket Nationals 2017

This year’s Sport England funded Table Cricket National Finals Day took place at Egbaston Cricket Ground on Saturday 2nd December 2017.

Over 40 players took part, as 6 Teams from Birmingham, Gloucester, Lincoln, Nottingham and Yorkshire battled it out for this years title. Teams were split into two pools where each team played each other to progress through to the Semi Finals and Play Offs.

Wilson Stuart returned as reigning champions and finished top of their pool and were drawn against new side Brimsham Green School making their first entry into the National Finals. It was a very close game in which Wilson Stuart won by just 14 runs to set up a final with Portland College. Foresight, Kings Mill and Linkage all fared well in their pool games. The 3rd place playoff match was between Brimsham and Kings Mill, in which Kings Mill managed to win.

Portland College and Wilson Stuart set the stage for a great final, with some quality in batting for both sides, but it was Wilson Stuart’s fielding where they were able to frustrate Portland College and hold on for a win to retain their title.

Along with the medals awarded, Brimsham Green picked up the fair play award and Harrison Andrews (Portland College) picked up the player of the tournament for his efforts, and positive and encouraging manor with his team and other players.

A big thank you goes to all the volunteers, umpires and Worcester University for providing a number of volunteers to help on the day and to Egbaston for hosting us again.

Our thank also goes to Sport England for continuing to invest in the development of Table Cricket and to the Paul Bush Foundation for their generous support of this event.

Feedback has been really positive from plays and coaches and we look forward to growing the game.

For more information on Table Cricket, please contact Rich Kerr Richard.kerr@sport.org

Table Cricket Finals     Table Cricket Finals

Sport England Logo        Paul Bush Foundation